Therapeutics

Displaying 1 - 10 of 23


Systems-Biology Infrastructure to Identify Drug Repurposing Opportunities as Antiviral & Anticancer Therapeutics

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an in-silico screening method to reveal new indications for existing drugs with known protein targets using a novel infrastructure. The infrastructure integrates multiple factors across system-biology models to create a drug discovery pipeline.


Licensing Contact

Clarissa Muere

615.343.2430

New Clostridium Difficile Recombinant Toxin for Safe Vaccine Development

A structural biology approach has identified a conserved region common to multiple Clostridium toxins. Specific mutations of the protein sequence in this region prevent the toxins from entering into intestinal cells, thereby preventing widespread tissue damage. These recombinant Clostridium toxins may be used to create a multivalent vaccine to protect against multiple species of Clostridium. Furthermore, the recombinant toxin may be used as a safer alternative to the native toxins in vaccine manufacturing. This discovery stems from a collaboration between the laboratories of Dr. Borden Lacy of Vanderbilt University and Dr. Roman Melnyk of the Hospital for Sick Children.


Licensing Contact

Seema Sinha

615.343.2430

Human antibodies targeting a novel flu epitope for use as a universal flu vaccine and treatment

Scientists at Vanderbilt have discovered a new class of human antibodies specific to a novel target for the detection, prevention, and treatment of influenza A viruses (IAV). Using structural characterization, they have identified a novel antigenic site on the hemagglutin (HA) head domain that may be targeted by multiple antibodies simultaneously in a non-competitive manner. They found that administration of these antibodies against an otherwise lethal challenge with viruses of H1N1, H3N2, H5N1, or H7N9 subtypes confers protection when used as prophylaxis or therapy against major IAV subtypes that are pathogenic to humans. These antibodies may prove effective as a universal influenza treatment or in the design of a universal influenza vaccine.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

Inventors

James Crowe, Seth Zost

New antibiotics against new targets in multi-drug resistant microorganisms

New everninomicin antibiotics including a potent bifunctional antibiotic natural product targeting two different and distant ribosomal sites are under development and can be readily produced using synthetic biology. Developing resistance to this bidentate antibiotic should be very difficult for pathogenic microorganisms.


Licensing Contact

Clarissa Muere

615.343.2430
Therapeutics
Infectious Disease

An Ergothioneine PET Radioligand for Imaging Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease

Vanderbilt researchers lead by Professor Wellington Pham, PhD, have developed a novel ergothioneine (ERGO) PET radioligand for imaging oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Therapeutics
Neuroscience/Neurology

Fused in Sarcoma (FUS) Nuclear Translocation Inhibitors for Preventing Fibrosis

The research team has found that one of the key regulators of collagen production in fibrotic diseases is the FUS ribonucleoprotein. This protein is upregulated in fibrotic diseases leading to additional collagen formation and deposition. In order to combat FUS upregulation, a new approach to blocking nuclear translocation has been developed using an FUS targeting peptide approach.


Licensing Contact

Clarissa Muere

615.343.2430
Therapeutics

Prevention of Cytokine Induced Apoptosis In Intestinal Epithelial Cells By A Probiotic Bacterium

The present invention provides therapeutic and prophylactic compositions for use in treating and preventing disorders involved epithelial cell apoptosis, such as gastrointestinal disorders (e.g., inflammatory bowel disease, Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis) in a subject, such as a human patient.


Licensing Contact

Seema Sinha

615.343.2430

Inventors

Brent Polk, Fang Yan
Therapeutics
Protein/Peptide
Gastrointestinal

Cooling-Responsive Gel for Local Drug Delivery Applications

Vanderbilt researchers have created a cooling-responsive gel implant that meets the need for non-invasive local drug delivery and is simple to activate, requiring only an ice pack for some applications, eliminating complex clinical equipment. This implant is ideal for alternative pain management or delivery of cancer therapeutics.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Leon Bellan
Therapeutics

Multisubstrate Inhibitors of Histone Acetylation Increase the Cytotoxicity of Chemotherapeutic Agents

Inhibitors of histone acetylation may constitute a novel class of potent therapy sensitizers applicable to a broad range of conventional cancer treatments.


Licensing Contact

Mike Villalobos

615.322.6751
Therapeutics
Oncology

Vascular Restoration Therapy with Cell-Penetrating CRADD Protein

Vascular inflammation caused by metabolic, autoimmune, and microbial insults mediates cardiovascular diseases that include hypertension and atherosclerosis (heart attacks, strokes), systemic lupus, and giant cell arteritis. An estimated 35 million Americans have hypercholesterolemia, contributing to 500,000 deaths underlying heart attacks and strokes. In these diseases, metabolic, autoimmune, and microbial insults continually challenge blood and vascular cells by triggering signaling to the nucleus mediated by BCL10. Genetic ablation of BCL10 rescues animals from atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, and fatty liver and insulin resistance due to overnutrition. Intracellular therapy with CP-CRADD is designed to extinguish BCL10-mediated noxious signals to avert vascular inflammation and its life-threatening complications including ruptured aneurysms in aorta and brain.


Licensing Contact

Clarissa Muere

615.343.2430
Therapeutics