Medical Devices

Displaying 1 - 10 of 69


Speculum-Free Diagnostic Probe for Optical Assessment of the Cervix

A new approach for obtaining less invasive optical measurements of the cervix has been developed that does not require the use of a speculum exam. This technology can visualize the cervix in vivo to find unique biomarkers that indicate various conditions such as preterm labor, cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and dysplasia.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Steerable Needles: A Better Turning Radius with Less Tissue Damage

A team of Vanderbilt engineers and surgeons have developed a new steerable needle that can make needle based biopsy and therapy delivery more accurate. A novel flexure-based tip design provides enhanced steerability while simultaneously minimizing tissue damage. The present device is useful for almost any needle-based procedure including biopsy, thermal ablation, brachytherapy, and drug delivery.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Rotary Planar Peristaltic Micropump (RPPM) and Rotary Planar Valve (RPV) for Microfluidic Systems

A Vanderbilt University research team led by Professor John Wikswo has developed low-cost, small-volume, metering peristaltic micropumps and microvalves. These pumps and valves can be used either as stand-alone devices incorporated into microfluidic subsystems, or as readily customized components for research or miniaturized point-of-care instruments, Lab-on-a-Chip devices, and disposable fluid delivery cartridges.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Easily Maneuverable Robotic Control System for a Magnetically Actuated Flexible Endoscope

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a system that allows for active control of the motion of a magnetically actuated flexible endoscope. The system decreases pain during endoscopic procedures and increases clinician control over the endoscope.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices

Self-Decoupled RF Coils for Optimized Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most important and versatile tools in the repertoire of diagnostics and medical imaging. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel, geometry independent, self-decoupling radiofrequency (RF) coil design that will allow MRI machines to generate images at a faster rate and with greater image quality.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Low-Cost Non-Invasive Handheld Ultrasound Device for Measuring Tissue Stiffness

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a hand-held device to quantitatively measure tissue stiffness for medical monitoring. This device is non-invasive, low-cost, and can be used at the point of care.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

A Novel Organs-On-Chip Platform

Vanderbilt researchers have created a new multi-organs-on-chip platform that comprises Perfusion Control systems, MicroFormulators, and MicroClinical Analyzers connected via fluidic networks. The real-time combination of multiple different solutions to create customized perfusion media and the analysis of the effluents from each well are both controlled by the intelligent use of a computer-operated system of pumps and valves. This permits, for the first time, a compact, low-cost system for creating a time-dependent drug dosage profile in a tissue system inside each well.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Wearable Metabolic Rate Sensor

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a portable, non-invasive sensor system that can take measurements through the skin to provide insights into metabolic rate and energy expenditure outside of a clinical setting. Existing methods for estimating metabolic rate rely on comparisons between user-reported body parameters and population averages, which can result in inaccurate estimates. Additionally, existing portable devices that provide estimates of metabolic rate are limited by factors such as cost per use and frequency of measurement. The present technology overcomes these limitations and can be directly integrated with commercial wearable devices for an accurate assessment of metabolic rate.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Devices

An Imaging Approach to Detect Parathyroid Gland Health During Endocrine Surgery

Vanderbilt researchers have designed a laser speckle imaging device to detect parathyroid gland viability during endocrine surgery, during which otherwise healthy parathyroid glands are prone to devascularization leading to long-term hypocalcemia. Currently, the surgeon must use his or her best judgement regarding the health of the parathyroid gland. This technology removes the guess work from the decision and provides a real-time assessment of the parathyroid viability.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Peripheral Nerve Catheter Advancer

A Vanderbilt clinician has developed a device capable of allowing a single practitioner to control both the needle and the catheter while using an ultrasound probe to place a nerve block. A nerve block involves the placement of anesthetic and other agents onto or near a nerve in order to temporarily disrupt the signal traveling along the nerve. To place a nerve block, a needle is inserted into the patient and a catheter is thread through the needle to inject the block. An ultrasound probe is used to identify placement of the catheter and nerve block. Current catheter advancement techniques require one clinician to hold the needle and control the catheter while a second person maneuvers the ultrasound probe to accurately deliver the nerve block. The proper placement of the nerve block is highly dependent on the coordination between the two individuals. Relying on a second individual can result in misplaced nerve blocks or prolong the placement process. The novel catheter advancer eliminates the need for a second clinician and makes the placement faster and more accurate.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Devices