Medical Devices

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Inexpensive Disposable Hydro-Jet Capsule Robot for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low-Income Countries

Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While screening programs have had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality, the majority of cases occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Typically, screening for gastric and esophageal cancer is performed using a flexible endoscope; however, endoscopy resources for these settings are traditionally limited. With the development of an inexpensive, disposable system by Vanderbilt researchers, gastroscopy and colonoscopy can be facilitated in areas hampered by a lack of access to the appropriate means.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Rotary planar peristaltic micropump (RPPM) and Rotary Planar Valve (RPV) for microfluidic systems

A research team led by Professor John Wikswo of Vanderbilt University has developed a low-cost, small-volume, metering peristaltic micro pumps and microvalves. They can be either utilized as a stand-alone device, or incorporated into microfluidic subsystems for research instruments or miniaturized point-of-care instruments, Lab on a Chip devices, and disposable fluid delivery cartridges. The key advantage of this pump is that it can deliver flow rates as low as a few hundred nL/min to tens of µL/min against pressure heads as high as 20 psi, at approximately 1/10th the cost of stand-alone commercial syringe and peristaltic pumps. The RPV can implement complicated fluid control protocols and fluidic mixing without bulky pneumatic controllers. Both the RPPM and RPV can be readily optimized for particular applications.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Technologies from the Robotics Lab of Professor Nabil Simaan

Professor Simaan and his lab have years of experiencing working collaboratively with commercial entities of various sizes. His research is focused on advanced robotics, mechanism design, control, and telemanipulation for medical applications. His projects have led the way in advancing several robotics technologies for medical applications including high dexterity, snake-like robots for surgery, steerable electrode arrays for cochlear implant surgery, robotics for single port access surgery, and natural orifice surgery.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices
Genitourinary

Non-Invasive Bacterial Identification for Acute Otitis Media using Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an optical-based method for real-time characterization of middle ear fluid in order to diagnose acute otitis media, also knows as a middle ear infection. The present technique allows for quick detection and identification of bacteria and can also be applied to other biological fluids in vivo.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Adaptive PCR: A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions

A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions. By directly monitoring the hybridization of fluorescently labelled L-DNA mimics of the template DNA strands and primers, it is possible to improve the efficiency of PCR in challenging conditions. This approach eliminates some of the sample preparation and trial and error that would otherwise be required for difficult sample types such as urine or other samples that contain high levels of salts.  In addition, this approach enables on-demand PCR in most any environment.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Research Reagent

Higher Accuracy Image-Guidance in Surgery

Vanderbilt engineers have designed and built a device that improves the accuracy of image-guidance systems (IGS) during surgery. The device creates a custom,  non-slip fit over the head and provides a rigid platform for attaching optical tracking markers to the patient, which is a critical component of image-guided neurosurgical procedures. The device can be used to improve the accuracy of IGS in other areas of the anatomy as well.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Breast Tumor Margin Detection System Using Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a technology that uses spatially offset Raman spectroscopy to obtain depth-resolved information from the margins of tumors. This helps to determine positive or negative tumor margins in applications such as breast lumpectomy, and the technology is currently being investigated for breast cancer margin detection.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Flexure Wrist for Surgical Devices

Vanderbilt researchers have designed a flexible wrist for use with manual or robotic surgical systems.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Minimally Invasive Telerobotic Platform for Transurethral Exploration and Intervention

This technology, developed in Vanderbilt University's Advanced Robotics and Mechanism Applications Laboratory, uses a minimally invasive telerobotic platform to perform transurethral procedures, such as transurethral resection. This robotic device provides high levels of precision and dexterity that improve patient outcomes in transurethral procedures.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices
Genitourinary

Compliant Insertion, Motion, and Force Control of Continuum Robots

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a framework for compliant insertion with hybrid motion and force control of continuum robots. This technology expands the capabilities of robotic surgery by providing continuum robots with the ability to autonomously discern, locate, and react to contact along their length and calculate forces at the tip, thus enabling quick and safe deployment of snake-like robots into deep anatomical passages or unknown environments.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548