Therapeutics

Displaying 11 - 20 of 25


New antibiotics against new targets in multi-drug resistant microorganisms

New everninomicin antibiotics including a potent bifunctional antibiotic natural product targeting two different and distant ribosomal sites are under development and can be readily produced using synthetic biology. Developing resistance to this bidentate antibiotic should be very difficult for pathogenic microorganisms.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Therapeutics
Infectious Disease

Systems and Methods for Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissues (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technique for contactless simulation of the central nervous system.  This involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system.  While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system. This technology has been protected by a portfolio of issued patents.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Small Molecule Mediated Transcriptional Induction of E-Cadherin and Inhibition of Epithelial-to-mesenchymal Transition


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Oncology

Novel anti-platelet therapy for treatment of thrombosis, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular injury

One of the leading causes of deaths in developed countries is related to thromboembolism. PAR-4 (protease activated receptor-4) is one of two receptors on the human platelet that respond to thrombin, the central enzyme of coagulation.  Researchers here at Vanderbilt University have developed novel antagonists of PAR-4 that could be beneficial for patients allowing for normal hemostasis during treatment for thrombotic events.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Cardiovascular

Small Molecule mGlu3 NAMs as Therapeutics for CNS Disorders

The Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD) has a mission to promote the translation of advances in basic science towards novel therapeutics. They have recruited faculty and staff with experience at over 10 different pharmaceutical companies to ensure a diverse set of approaches, techniques and philosophies to advancing compounds. Together they aim to de-risk drug discovery programs.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics

mGlu3 NAMs as Therapeutics for Chemoresistant Tumors

Targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu3) has been linked as a potential therapeutic to many neurological disorders and well as oncology through the use of dual specific mGlu2/3 Antagonists (LY341495, RO4491533, MGS0039, RO4988546).


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics

Small Molecule-GIRK Potassium Channel Modulators That Are Anxiolytic Therapeutics

The G-protein activated, inward-rectifying potassium (K+) channels, "GIRKs", are a family of ion channels that has been the focus of intense research interest for nearly two decades. GIRK has been shown to play important roles in the pathophysiology of diseases such as anxiety, epilepsy, Down's syndrome, pain perception and drug addiction. Here scientists at Vanderbilt developed the first truly potent, effective, and selective GIRK activator, ML297 (VU0456810) and demonstrated that ML297 is active in animal models of epilepsy. While the group is using ML297 to continue to explore the therapeutic benefits of GIRK modulation, they are continuing to develop more selective and druggable GIRK inhibitors from different scaffolds.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Analgesic

New Molecules Clear Chronic Infections by Disrupting Bacterial Energy Production Pathways

New compounds developed at Vanderbilt demonstrate a unique mechanism of broad spectrum activity to stymy antibacterial resistance. The compounds are particularly useful in chronic infections where long term antibiotic therapy fails, because it specifically kills "small colony variants" -- the bacteria that have developed resistance mechanisms. These compounds show promise in treating Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), and in overcoming difficult-to-treat infections in bone in cystic fibrosis patients. These compounds could be combined with new (and old) antimicrobial drugs to outwit resistant bacterial infections.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Therapeutics

New Drug for Blood Clot: FXII Inhibitors to Treat Thrombosis

Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel, which may cause reduced blood flow to a tissue, or even tissue death. Thrombosis, inflammation, and infections are responsible for >70% of all human mortality. Thrombosis is also the major factor for heart disease and stroke. 500,000 die from thrombosis every year in Europe. Inhibitory treatment of these conditions may also improve the outcomes of several non-fatal diseases. Researchers from Vanderbilt University and Oregon Health & Science University have jointly discovered new monoclonal antibodies that potently inhibit the blood coagulation protein factor XII (FXII), a critical player in the pathway, and anticoagulate blood. This invention provides foundation for commercial development of anti-thrombotic drugs based on new molecular entities.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430
Therapeutics

Inhibitors of Inward-Rectifying Potassium Channels (Insecticide)

This research targets IRK.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852