Diagnostics

Displaying 1 - 10 of 27


Adaptive PCR: A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions

A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions. By directly monitoring the hybridization of fluorescently labelled L-DNA mimics of the template DNA strands and primers, it is possible to improve the efficiency of PCR in challenging conditions. This approach eliminates some of the sample preparation and trial and error that would otherwise be required for difficult sample types such as urine or other samples that contain high levels of salts.  In addition, this approach enables on-demand PCR in most any environment.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Research Reagent

PIQASO: A rigid phantom for comprehensive end-to-end evaluation of online adaptive radiotherapy systems

There is currently no radiotherapy phantom capable of quantitatively assessing all components of an online adaptive radiotherapy (online ART) system in a comprehensive end-to-end test.Represented here is a novel, rigid phantom that can simultaneously evaluate an online ART system's image acquisition, deformable image registration, contour propagation, plan re-optimization, dose calculation, and beam delivery in a single process that is robust, quantitative, and convenient.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

One-Step Hydrosilylation for Click Chemistry Compatible Surfaces

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a one-step hydrosilylation synthesis of azide surfaces for the preparation of click chemistry compatible substrates. In this process, an organic azide is formed in a single step on a hydrogen-terminated silicon support, yielding a surface that is ready to undergo click reactions as desired. Simple, efficient, and versatile, click chemistry is widely used and is particularly useful for biosensing applications. A click reaction can be utilized to attach a molecular or biological probe for point-of-care diagnostics and chemical screening.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Bioresorbable RF Coils for Post-Surgical Monitoring by MRI

Vanderbilt researchers have developed bioresorbable RF coils to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for use in post-surgical monitoring.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Mark Does, John Rogers

Speculum-Free Diagnostic Probe for Optical Assessment of the Cervix

A new approach for obtaining less invasive optical measurements of the cervix has been developed that does not require the use of a speculum exam. This technology can visualize the cervix in vivo to find unique biomarkers that indicate various conditions such as preterm labor, cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and dysplasia.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Low-Cost Non-Invasive Handheld Ultrasound Device for Measuring Tissue Stiffness

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a hand-held device to quantitatively measure tissue stiffness for medical monitoring. This device is non-invasive, low-cost, and can be used at the point of care.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Prognostic Assay for High-altitude Pulmonary Hypertension in Cattle (Brisket Disease)

This genetic test identifies cattle at high risk of developing pulmonary hypertension at high altitudes (often called "brisket disease").  Brisket disease afflicts about 5% of cattle at high altitudes and the current predictive test for at-risk cattle is a measure of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP).  This current PAP test has some major drawbacks.  First, it is an invasive test.  Secondly, it is not accurate at lower elevations -- so at-risk cattle cannot identified before incurring the cost of transport to high altitude.  There is no treatment for the disease except prompt removal of the animal to lower elevations.  This technology measures genetic variants that confer susceptibility to brisket disease, and could be developed into a diagnostic or a prognostic test for use prior to shipping cattle to higher elevations or in breeding operations.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Point of Care Rheological Assay for Sickle Cell Disease

Vanderbilt researchers have created a novel technology for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease states using the rheological properties of a blood sample with a lateral flow membrane.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Advanced Ultrasound Imaging for Kidney Stone Detection

The standard for kidney stone detection is through the use of computed tomography (CT). However, CT is expensive and delivers harmful ionizing radiation into the body. Ultrasound would be the ideal way to detect kidney stones except that it performs poorly in detecting and accurately sizing stones. Vanderbilt researchers inventors have developed a technique that is able to separate hard, mineralized material (i.e kidney stones) from soft tissue in a way that is both cheaper and safer than CT and performs better than conventional ultrasound imaging.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Low-cost, Normally Closed Microfluidic Valve

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a normally closed valve that is able to provide selective movement of small fluid quantities in a microfluidic device. The present microfluidic valve can be actuated using a simple rotating drivehead and mechanical support, greatly simplifying the valve design.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503