Diagnostics

Displaying 1 - 10 of 25


Microneedle Device to Detect Early Lyme Disease

As the geographical territory of ticks continues to expand, new diagnostics for quickly detecting Lyme disease are becoming increasingly necessary. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a simple and inexpensive microneedle technology for collecting bacteria from a tick bite site, allowing rapid detection by PCR and treatment options weeks before the current standard.


Licensing Contact

Seema Sinha

615.343.2430

Inventors

Emily Kight
Diagnostics
Infectious Disease

Early Detection of Implant Loosening

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a new technique for identifying implantloosening. The technique utilizes the analysis of synovial fluid as an early indicator of potential loosening of orthopedic implants.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

A Novel Organs-On-Chip Platform

Vanderbilt researchers have created a new multi-organs-on-chip platform that comprises Perfusion Control systems, MicroFormulators, and MicroClinical Analyzers connected via fluidic networks. The real-time combination of multiple different solutions to create customized perfusion media and the analysis of the effluents from each well are both controlled by the intelligent use of a computer-operated system of pumps and valves. This permits, for the first time, a compact, low-cost system for creating a time-dependent drug dosage profile in a tissue system inside each well.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Point of Care Rheological Assay for Sickle Cell Disease

Vanderbilt researchers have created a novel technology for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease states using the rheological properties of a blood sample with a lateral flow membrane.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

One-Step Hydrosilylation for Click Chemistry Compatible Surfaces

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a one-step hydrosilylation synthesis of azide surfaces for the preparation of click chemistry compatible substrates. In this process, an organic azide is formed in a single step on a hydrogen-terminated silicon support, yielding a surface that is ready to undergo click reactions as desired. Simple, efficient, and versatile, click chemistry is widely used and is particularly useful for biosensing applications. A click reaction can be utilized to attach a molecular or biological probe for point-of-care diagnostics and chemical screening.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Adaptive PCR: A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions

A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions. By directly monitoring the hybridization of fluorescently labelled L-DNA mimics of the template DNA strands and primers, it is possible to improve the efficiency of PCR in challenging conditions. This approach eliminates some of the sample preparation and trial and error that would otherwise be required for difficult sample types such as urine or other samples that contain high levels of salts.  In addition, this approach enables on-demand PCR in most any environment.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Research Reagent

PIQASO: A rigid phantom for comprehensive end-to-end evaluation of online adaptive radiotherapy systems

There is currently no radiotherapy phantom capable of quantitatively assessing all components of an online adaptive radiotherapy (online ART) system in a comprehensive end-to-end test.Represented here is a novel, rigid phantom that can simultaneously evaluate an online ART system's image acquisition, deformable image registration, contour propagation, plan re-optimization, dose calculation, and beam delivery in a single process that is robust, quantitative, and convenient.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Bioresorbable RF Coils for Post-Surgical Monitoring by MRI

Vanderbilt researchers have developed bioresorbable RF coils to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for use in post-surgical monitoring.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Mark Does, John Rogers

Speculum-Free Diagnostic Probe for Optical Assessment of the Cervix

A new approach for obtaining less invasive optical measurements of the cervix has been developed that does not require the use of a speculum exam. This technology can visualize the cervix in vivo to find unique biomarkers that indicate various conditions such as preterm labor, cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and dysplasia.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Low-Cost Non-Invasive Handheld Ultrasound Device for Measuring Tissue Stiffness

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a hand-held device to quantitatively measure tissue stiffness for medical monitoring. This device is non-invasive, low-cost, and can be used at the point of care.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548