Medical Imaging

Displaying 1 - 10 of 44


Image-Guided Navigation System for Endoscopic Eye Surgery

A flexible endoscope for ophthalmic orbital surgery is presented. The endoscope has illuminating fiber, image fiber and a free conduit to deliver purge gas/fluid in addition to instruments such as ablation instruments, coagulating instrument or a medication delivery instrument.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

PosiSeat(TM): Assured Seating of Threaded Surgical Components

Vanderbilt presents an intraoperative device for taking the guesswork out of whether or not a threaded component is securely affixed to bone. This device is an anchor driver that automatically releases upon proper seating of the anchor on the bone of interest.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505

Portfolio of Image-Guidance and Organ Localization Technologies from the Lab of Professor Michael Miga

The focus of Dr. Miga's laboratory is on the development of new paradigms in detection, diagnosis, characterization, and treatment of disease through the integration of computational models into research and clinical practice.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Image Guidance System for Breast Cancer Surgery

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an image guidance system that aims to reduce the revision rate for breast conserving surgeries through the use of intraoperative tumor location. The platform integrates MRI imaging, optical tracking, tracked ultrasound, and patient specific biomechanical models to provide a superior tumor localization end result.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Speculum-Free Diagnostic Probe for Optical Assessment of the Cervix

A new approach for obtaining less invasive optical measurements of the cervix has been developed that does not require the use of a speculum exam. This technology can visualize the cervix in vivo to find unique biomarkers that indicate various conditions such as preterm labor, cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and dysplasia.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Self-Decoupled RF Coils for Optimized Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most important and versatile tools in the repertoire of diagnostics and medical imaging. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel, geometry independent, self-decoupling radiofrequency (RF) coil design that will allow MRI machines to generate images at a faster rate and with greater image quality.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Low-Cost Non-Invasive Handheld Ultrasound Device for Measuring Tissue Stiffness

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a hand-held device to quantitatively measure tissue stiffness for medical monitoring. This device is non-invasive, low-cost, and can be used at the point of care.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

pECHO: Easy to Use Smartphone App for Assisting in Transesophageal Echocardiography Exam

Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a test that uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the heart. It provides more detail that a standard echocardiogram. Vanderbilt researchers have created a software that creates an easy to follow, step-by-step procedure for a transesophageal echocardiography exam.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Selective Size Imaging using Filters via Diffusion Times (SSIFT)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel MRI-based method for fast, robust, and accurate imaging of biological tissue by selecting a specific cell size range (such as tumors) without the need for a contrast agent. One exciting application of this method is imaging brain metastases (BM) that are difficult to differentiate from other brain abnormalities such as radionecrosis when using existing approaches.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Junzhong Xu
Medical Imaging

Advanced Ultrasound Imaging for Kidney Stone Detection

The standard for kidney stone detection is through the use of computed tomography (CT). However, CT is expensive and delivers harmful ionizing radiation into the body. Ultrasound would be the ideal way to detect kidney stones except that it performs poorly in detecting and accurately sizing stones. Vanderbilt researchers inventors have developed a technique that is able to separate hard, mineralized material (i.e kidney stones) from soft tissue in a way that is both cheaper and safer than CT and performs better than conventional ultrasound imaging.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548