Medical Imaging

Displaying 1 - 10 of 42


Inexpensive Disposable Hydro-Jet Capsule Robot for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low-Income Countries

Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While screening programs have had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality, the majority of cases occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Typically, screening for gastric and esophageal cancer is performed using a flexible endoscope; however, endoscopy resources for these settings are traditionally limited. With the development of an inexpensive, disposable system by Vanderbilt researchers, gastroscopy and colonoscopy can be facilitated in areas hampered by a lack of access to the appropriate means.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Non-Invasive Bacterial Identification for Acute Otitis Media using Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an optical-based method for real-time characterization of middle ear fluid in order to diagnose acute otitis media, also knows as a middle ear infection. The present technique allows for quick detection and identification of bacteria and can also be applied to other biological fluids in vivo.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Breast Tumor Margin Detection System Using Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a technology that uses spatially offset Raman spectroscopy to obtain depth-resolved information from the margins of tumors. This helps to determine positive or negative tumor margins in applications such as breast lumpectomy, and the technology is currently being investigated for breast cancer margin detection.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Relaxation Time Discriminated 1H NMR for Bone Mechanical/Fracture Property Diagnostics

Advances in modern MRI pulse sequences, including ultrashort-echo time and related MRI methods for imaging short T2 signals, have enabled clinically-practical cortical bone imaging. Researchers at the Vanderbilt University Institute of Imaging Science have developed a method of distinguishing and quantifying nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signals for cortical bone analysis.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Non-Invasive Cell Size Detection

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new method for using contrast enhanced MRI to non-invasively map and quantify cell size on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Using this approach, it is possible to monitor and detect diseases or treatments that alter the distribution of cell sizes such as cancer, muscular dystrophy, hepatocellular hypertrophy, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Self-Decoupled RF Coils for Optimized Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most important and versatile tools in the repertoire of diagnostics and medical imaging. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel, geometry independent, self-decoupling radiofrequency (RF) coil design that will allow MRI machines to generate images at a faster rate and with greater image quality.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Modeling Tissue Elasticity as a Complement to Imaging Modalities

A Vanderbilt researcher has developed an elastography framework for determining elastic properties of tissue using existing imaging technologies. Elastography is the direct imaging of tissue elasticity parameters, and can be quite helpful for diagnostic and/or therapeutic purposes.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Inventors

Michael Miga
Medical Imaging

Speculum-Free Diagnostic Probe for Optical Assessment of the Cervix

A new approach for obtaining less invasive optical measurements of the cervix has been developed that does not require the use of a speculum exam. This technology can visualize the cervix in vivo to find unique biomarkers that indicate various conditions such as preterm labor, cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and dysplasia.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Realistic Abdominal Phantom with Anatomical Ligamenture

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a medical simulator that realistically emulates the surgical environment found during laparoscopic abdominal interventions such as liver resection. The device recreates several important conditions that can each deform the organ of interest, thereby causing preoperative imaging to be misaligned from what the surgeon sees intraoperatively. Additionally, the technology includes realistic ligamenture that can be dissected, which also deforms the liver in a realistic fashion. By recreating these features in the simulator, the surgeon experiences a more realistic and life-like simulation of abdominal procedures that aids in the training process.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Marker Enrichment Modeling (MEM) Software for Automated Cell Population Characterization and Identification in Complex Tissue Microenvironments

Marker enrichment modeling (MEM) provides a crucial missing piece for true machine learning analysis of cell identities and phenotypes in complex tissue microenvironments, including human immune disorders and cancer.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548