Thin Films & Nanomaterials

Displaying 1 - 10 of 16


3D Junction Bipolar Membranes: More Efficient and Reliable Electrodialysis

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a unique membrane material for more efficient and reliable eletrodialysis. By utilizing a 3D junction structure, the nanofiber bipolar membrane does not degrade or delaminate during high current passage unlike commercial 2D membranes that are currently available.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Electrospun Filter Media:Effective Removal of Salt Aerosols

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a specialized filter media to remove salt aerosols from the air. The filter media is able to be merged with other filter components to create a single filter for separating multiple types of airborne particles. Using the developed filter media provides more versatility and functionality to the manufacturing of filters for air and molecular purification products.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

One-Step Hydrosilylation for Click Chemistry Compatible Surfaces

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a one-step hydrosilylation synthesis of azide surfaces for the preparation of click chemistry compatible substrates. In this process, an organic azide is formed in a single step on a hydrogen-terminated silicon support, yielding a surface that is ready to undergo click reactions as desired. Simple, efficient, and versatile, click chemistry is widely used and is particularly useful for biosensing applications. A click reaction can be utilized to attach a molecular or biological probe for point-of-care diagnostics and chemical screening.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Nanoporous Atomically Thin Graphene Membranes for Desalination & Nanofiltration

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an atomically thin membrane with extremely high selectivity and permeability for use in desalination and nanofiltration applications.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Nanoporous Atomically Thin Breathable Personal Protective Membranes

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an atomically thin membrane with extremely high selectivity and permeability for use in personal protective equipment.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

System for Transporting, Sorting, and Assembling Nanoscale Objects

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new system for transporting and sorting nanoscale and mesoscale particles and biomolecules. The system is able to achieve size-based sorting and captures/arranges the particles within a few seconds, which is significantly faster than the existing method of diffusion-based transport.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Justus Ndukaife

Porous Materials with Active Sites Created via In-Pore Synthesis

Vanderbilt researchers have synthesized porous adsorbent materials for the capture of toxic industrial chemicals. These adsorbent materials have finely dispersed reactive sites that allow for higher adsorption capacities than existing materials. They can be used in filters for the military, homeland security, first responders, and for a wide range of industrial and commercial catalysts to capture toxic gases such as ammonia and sulfur dioxide.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Electrochemically Actuated Optical Modulator

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a novel approach for creating dynamic, tunable reflective color displays using an electrochemical modulator. The technology can be implemented into devices requiring low power reflective color displays, such as smart watches and e-readers, and is adaptable for spectral control across a broad spectrum of frequencies from the visible to the far infrared. This technology provides a low power, tunable approach for modulating the optical properties of a material.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Actively Reconfigurable Metasurfaces for Dynamic Optical Components

Phase change materials (PCMs) are a fascinating class of materials that can change certain material properties (e.g., absorbance or reflectivity) upon the application of a stimulus. Researchers at Vanderbilt University have used a PCM to create a novel metamaterial that can be reconfigured for use in a wide range of potential optical and integrated photonic applications from the infrared to terahertz spectral domain.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433