Gastrointestinal

Displaying 1 - 6 of 6


Inexpensive Disposable Hydro-Jet Capsule Robot for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low-Income Countries

Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While screening programs have had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality, the majority of cases occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Typically, screening for gastric and esophageal cancer is performed using a flexible endoscope; however, endoscopy resources for these settings are traditionally limited. With the development of an inexpensive, disposable system by Vanderbilt researchers, gastroscopy and colonoscopy can be facilitated in areas hampered by a lack of access to the appropriate means.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Traveler's Diarrhea Vaccine for Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC)

Vanderbilt researchers are developing a novel vaccine for preventing enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) infection of the gut which causes traveler's diarrhea and childhood death in developing countries. The vaccine uses colonization surface antigens and their constituent proteins to generate an immune response. This prevents infection by blocking the ability of bacteria to adhere to the intestinal mucosa. Mice treated with this vaccine showed significantly reduced disease and bacterial colonization compared to control. Preclinical development of this vaccine is ongoing and includes testing of different adjuvants and routes of administration. ETEC is a leading cause of gastrointestinal disease in developing countries affecting both residents and visitors. Residents in particular are primarily children who suffer high morbidity and mortality from the dehydrating effects of the illness. Visitors include the approximately 800 -- 1000 million people who travel to developing countries each year with 20 -- 60 % of them developing this illness. A commercially available vaccine to inoculate residents and travelers against ETEC would represent a significant opportunity to satisfy an unmet need and improve human health.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Bedside Disposable Endoscope

Bedside Disposable Endoscope


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Gastrointestinal

Wireless Tablet Application for Remote Collaboration and Training in Colonoscopy

Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. During patient screenings for populations at risk, polyp detection rates depend on the endoscopist's ability to identify the lesions, which takes years of practice and training. Endoscopic training can be challenging for the trainee and preceptor. Frustration can result from ineffective communication regarding areas of interest. Our team developed a novel tablet application for real-time mirroring of the colonoscopy examination that allows preceptors to make annotations directly on the viewing monitor that facilitates medical training and enables collaboration among several endoscopists during a procedure.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Local Magnetic Actuation for Obese And Pediatric Patients

Researchers in Vanderbilt University's STORM Lab have developed a novel actuation system that uses magnetic coupling to transmit mechanical power across a physical barrier. This technology is particularly suited for use in minimally invasive surgical procedures for manipulating surgical instruments across tissue barriers.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Robotics
Gastrointestinal

Wireless Tissue Palpation for Minimally Invasive Robotic Surgery Techniques

Researchers in Vanderbilt University's STORM Lab have developed a wireless palpation device that uses magnetic coupling between two units to provide valuable feedback about tissue properties and potential abnormalities. The wireless capabilities of this technology make it ideally suited for minimally invasive surgery and natural orifice procedures, as the device does not require the use of a surgical port.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Gastrointestinal