General Engineering

Displaying 1 - 10 of 14


Miniature Magnetorheological Brake Technology

A team of Vanderbilt engineers have developed a miniature magnetorheological (MR) brake with a combination of high braking torque and a fast response time. With potential applicability over a wide spectrum of applications, the device was initially developed with robotic and haptic applications in mind.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Systems and Methods for Reduced End-face Reflection Back-Coupling in Fiber-Optics

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a technology for suppressing end-face reflections in most fiber optic components, thereby reducing a significant source of noise in fiber-optic systems. The solution employs a fused-spliced length of angle-polished no-core fiber in order to angle reflections outside the acceptance numerical aperture of the fiber and spatially offsetting any reflections to minimize back-coupling. The result is a compact solution that significant decreases noise without significantly altering the specifications of the fiber-optic component.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Ultrasound Device for Underwater High Resolution Imaging in Turbid Water

A team of Vanderbilt researchers has developed a novel system for producing 3D, real-time, high-resolution visualization within arms reach of a diver. The system uses a custom ultrasound array and mirror system in conjunction with software and algorithms to overcome the limitations of existing systems, enabling the diver to see through turbid water in real-time.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Real-Time Feedback for Positioning Electrode Arrays in Cochlear Implants

Vanderbilt researchers have discovered a method ofmonitoring the placement of electrodes in cochlearimplants (CIs) through the use of electrical impedancemeasurements. This technology offers real-timefeedback on electrode positioning, which can beused to more accurately place electrodes duringinitial implantation, or better program the implantsafter they have been placed. These enhancementscombine to give increased hearing quality to bothnew and existing CI patients.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Cooling-Triggered Self-Destructing Electronics

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed self-destructing electrical conductors that dissolve and vanish below a certain critical temperature, which is achieved either by actively cooling the circuit or by removing a heat source.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Leon Bellan, Xin Zhang

Porous Materials with Active Sites Created via In-Pore Synthesis

Vanderbilt researchers have synthesized porous adsorbent materials for the capture of toxic industrial chemicals. These adsorbent materials have finely dispersed reactive sites that allow for higher adsorption capacities than existing materials. They can be used in filters for the military, homeland security, first responders, and for a wide range of industrial and commercial catalysts to capture toxic gases such as ammonia and sulfur dioxide.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Electrochemically Actuated Optical Modulator

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a novel approach for creating dynamic, tunable reflective color displays using an electrochemical modulator. The technology can be implemented into devices requiring low power reflective color displays, such as smart watches and e-readers, and is adaptable for spectral control across a broad spectrum of frequencies from the visible to the far infrared. This technology provides a low power, tunable approach for modulating the optical properties of a material.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Single Stage, High Performance Transmission Mechanism

A researcher from Vanderbilt University has created a novel single stage transmission with a high transmission ratio that was born from the physics of a coin wobbling as it rolls on a table. This innovation offers a great advantage over existing single stage transmissions in terms of a smaller and lighter weight design, increased efficiency, and a reduction in manufacturing cost.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Dual Interlocked Logic (DIL) Circuit

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel combinatorial logic circuit that prevents the propagation of signal glitches such as those caused by radiation-induced transients. The interlocked-feedback circuit accomplishes this without the loss of any speed. The circuit is designed for robustness in both combinatorial and sequential logic applications.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Electrospun Filter Media:Effective Removal of Salt Aerosols

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a specialized filter media to remove salt aerosols from the air. The filter media is able to be merged with other filter components to create a single filter for separating multiple types of airborne particles. Using the developed filter media provides more versatility and functionality to the manufacturing of filters for air and molecular purification products.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503