Browse Technologies

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Novel anti-platelet therapy for treatment of thrombosis, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular injury

One of the leading causes of deaths in developed countries is related to thromboembolism. PAR-4 (protease activated receptor-4) is one of two receptors on the human platelet that respond to thrombin, the central enzyme of coagulation.  Researchers here at Vanderbilt University have developed novel antagonists of PAR-4 that could be beneficial for patients allowing for normal hemostasis during treatment for thrombotic events.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Cardiovascular

Novel Target Regulating Angiogenesis

Vanderbilt scientists have discovered that the receptor tyrosine phosphatase DEP-1 plays a significant role in angiogenesis and that modulation of the DEP-1 receptor with certain agents can affect endothelial cell growth. The research team has developed antibodies that bind to the ectodomain of a mammalian transmembrane protein known as DEP-1 (for density enhanced protein) or CD148. CD148 (also named DEP-1/PTPn) is a receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase that is abundantly expressed in vascular endothelial cells, hematopoietic-cell lineages, duct epithelia of thyroid, mammary and gastrointestinal tissues.


Licensing Contact

Mike Villalobos

615.322.6751
Therapeutics

Small Molecule Mediated Transcriptional Induction of E-Cadherin and Inhibition of Epithelial-to-mesenchymal Transition


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Oncology

Systems-Biology Infrastructure to Identify Drug Repurposing Opportunities as Antiviral & Anticancer Therapeutics

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an in-silico screening method to reveal new indications for existing drugs with known protein targets using a novel infrastructure. The infrastructure integrates multiple factors across system-biology models to create a drug discovery pipeline.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430

Targeting microRNAs as a Treatment for Vascular Disease

Vanderbilt researchers have identified a highly expressed microRNA crucial in angiotensin induced hypertension; and developed a therapeutic strategy that focuses on local or systemic administration of antisense microRNA to inhibit microRNA expression as treatment for vascular diseases. Promising data in animal models reveals that the inhibition of such microRNA not only prevents fibrosis but also reverses previously established aortic stiffening.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Small Molecule mGlu5 NAMs For The Treatment of Depressive Disorders or Parkinson's Disease

The Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD) has a mission to promote the translation of advances in basic science towards novel therapeutics. They have recruited faculty and staff with experience at over 10 different pharmaceutical companies to ensure a diverse set of approaches, techniques and philosophies to advancing compounds. Together they aim to de-risk drug discovery programs.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852

Multisubstrate Inhibitors of Histone Acetylation Increase the Cytotoxicity of Chemotherapeutic Agents

Inhibitors of histone acetylation may constitute a novel class of potent therapy sensitizers applicable to a broad range of conventional cancer treatments.


Licensing Contact

Mike Villalobos

615.322.6751
Therapeutics
Oncology

Small Molecule mGlu3 NAMs as Therapeutics for CNS Disorders

The Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD) has a mission to promote the translation of advances in basic science towards novel therapeutics. They have recruited faculty and staff with experience at over 10 different pharmaceutical companies to ensure a diverse set of approaches, techniques and philosophies to advancing compounds. Together they aim to de-risk drug discovery programs.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics

mGlu3 NAMs as Therapeutics for Chemoresistant Tumors

Targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu3) has been linked as a potential therapeutic to many neurological disorders and well as oncology through the use of dual specific mGlu2/3 Antagonists (LY341495, RO4491533, MGS0039, RO4988546).


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics

Cell-Permeable Socs Proteins That Inhibit Cytokine-Induced Signaling

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a unique polypeptide using cell-penetrating SOCS polypeptides or SOCS sequences designed to inhibits cytokine signaling and thus prevent or treat inflammation or an inflammatory related disease such as diabetes. This strategy has been validated in NOD mice models for either induced or naturally occurring diabetes and have been efficacious.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430
Therapeutics