Browse Technologies

Displaying 11 - 20 of 24


New Molecules Clear Chronic Infections by Disrupting Bacterial Energy Production Pathways

New compounds developed at Vanderbilt demonstrate a unique mechanism of broad spectrum activity to stymy antibacterial resistance. The compounds are particularly useful in chronic infections where long term antibiotic therapy fails, because it specifically kills "small colony variants" -- the bacteria that have developed resistance mechanisms. These compounds show promise in treating Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), and in overcoming difficult-to-treat infections in bone in cystic fibrosis patients. These compounds could be combined with new (and old) antimicrobial drugs to outwit resistant bacterial infections.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Therapeutics

Novel anti-platelet therapy for treatment of thrombosis, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular injury

One of the leading causes of deaths in developed countries is related to thromboembolism. PAR-4 (protease activated receptor-4) is one of two receptors on the human platelet that respond to thrombin, the central enzyme of coagulation.  Researchers here at Vanderbilt University have developed novel antagonists of PAR-4 that could be beneficial for patients allowing for normal hemostasis during treatment for thrombotic events.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Cardiovascular

Small Molecule Mediated Transcriptional Induction of E-Cadherin and Inhibition of Epithelial-to-mesenchymal Transition


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Oncology

Small Molecule mGlu3 NAMs as Therapeutics for CNS Disorders

The Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD) has a mission to promote the translation of advances in basic science towards novel therapeutics. They have recruited faculty and staff with experience at over 10 different pharmaceutical companies to ensure a diverse set of approaches, techniques and philosophies to advancing compounds. Together they aim to de-risk drug discovery programs.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics

mGlu3 NAMs as Therapeutics for Chemoresistant Tumors

Targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu3) has been linked as a potential therapeutic to many neurological disorders and well as oncology through the use of dual specific mGlu2/3 Antagonists (LY341495, RO4491533, MGS0039, RO4988546).


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics

Protein that protects probiotics from desiccation, leading to improved gut colonization

Probiotic supplements undergo significant water loss before consumption, killing many of their bacteria and rendering them less effective. Vanderbilt researchers have discovered a protein that protects against damage caused by desiccation and shown that this molecular shield can be added to probiotics to help them survive and colonize the gut. This platform technology can be broadly incorporated into new or existing supplements to make them more efficacious and even improve costs and distribution.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

Inventors

Eric Skaar, Erin Green
Therapeutics

Targeted photodynamic therapy for S. aureus infections

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a combination photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting MRSA infections in skin that is not only effective but also HIGHLY SPECIFIC and LESS SUSCEPTIBLE TO RESISTANCE, adding a much needed therapy to our quickly depleting arsenal against this pathogen.


Licensing Contact

Cameron Sargent

615.343.2430

Inventors

Eric Skaar
Therapeutics

An Ergothioneine PET Radioligand for Imaging Oxidative Stress in Alzheimer's Disease

Vanderbilt researchers lead by Professor Wellington Pham, PhD, have developed a novel ergothioneine (ERGO) PET radioligand for imaging oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Therapeutics
Neuroscience/Neurology

Cell-Permeable Socs Proteins That Inhibit Cytokine-Induced Signaling

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a unique polypeptide using cell-penetrating SOCS polypeptides or SOCS sequences designed to inhibits cytokine signaling and thus prevent or treat inflammation or an inflammatory related disease such as diabetes. This strategy has been validated in NOD mice models for either induced or naturally occurring diabetes and have been efficacious.


Licensing Contact

Clarissa Muere

615.343.2430
Therapeutics

Cooling-Responsive Gel for Local Drug Delivery Applications

Vanderbilt researchers have created a cooling-responsive gel implant that meets the need for non-invasive local drug delivery and is simple to activate, requiring only an ice pack for some applications, eliminating complex clinical equipment. This implant is ideal for alternative pain management or delivery of cancer therapeutics.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Leon Bellan
Therapeutics