Browse Technologies

Displaying 11 - 20 of 20


High Performance Nanofiltration Membranes

A research team led by Professor Shihong Lin at Vanderbilt University has developed a novel method to enhance the performance of nanofiltration (NF) membrane. This new approach has three major benefits:1) uses a class of additives that is low-cost and widely available2) is readily compatible with existing manufacturing infrastructure3) achieves ultra-sharp selectivity or enhanced perm-selectivity


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Shihong Lin

High-Performance Anti-Fouling, Anti-Wetting Membrane for Wastewater Distillation

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel membrane for membrane distillation that is resistant to both fouling and wetting and can be used to treat highly contaminated saline wastewater.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Lanthanide Oxide Nanoparticle Film Deposition Process

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a method for forming a film of lanthanide oxide nanoparticles using electrophoretic deposition. This technique is straightforward to set up and provides thickness control at high deposition rates, enabling site selective particle assembly for any size and shape.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Nanostructured Molybdenum (IV) Disulfide (MoS2) Electrodes for use in Solar Cells

Quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are a widely studied system for harvesting light and converting it to electrical energy. Quantum dots (QDs) are an attractive photoabsorber because they have large absorption coefficients and their energy of absorption in the visible region can be tuned based on their size. Molybdenum (IV) disulfide (MoS2) is a naturally occurring semiconductor found in nature as the mineral molybdenite that can be synthesized from inexpensive, earth-abundant materials for use in solar cells.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Porous Materials with Active Sites Created via In-Pore Synthesis

Vanderbilt researchers have synthesized porous adsorbent materials for the capture of toxic industrial chemicals. These adsorbent materials have finely dispersed reactive sites that allow for higher adsorption capacities than existing materials. They can be used in filters for the military, homeland security, first responders, and for a wide range of industrial and commercial catalysts to capture toxic gases such as ammonia and sulfur dioxide.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

System for Transporting, Sorting, and Assembling Nanoscale Objects

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new system for transporting and sorting nanoscale and mesoscale particles and biomolecules. The system is able to achieve size-based sorting and captures/arranges the particles within a few seconds, which is significantly faster than the existing method of diffusion-based transport.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Electrochemically Actuated Optical Modulator

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a novel approach for creating dynamic, tunable reflective color displays using an electrochemical modulator. The technology can be implemented into devices requiring low power reflective color displays, such as smart watches and e-readers, and is adaptable for spectral control across a broad spectrum of frequencies from the visible to the far infrared. This technology provides a low power, tunable approach for modulating the optical properties of a material.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

3D Junction Bipolar Membranes: More Efficient and Reliable Electrodialysis

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a unique membrane material for more efficient and reliable eletrodialysis. By utilizing a 3D junction structure, the nanofiber bipolar membrane does not degrade or delaminate during high current passage unlike commercial 2D membranes that are currently available.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Porous Silicon Membrane Waveguide Biosensor

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a low-cost, high sensitivity sensor based on a porous silicon (PSi) membrane waveguide. This sensor is designed to be a cost-effective alternative to conventional fiber optic and SPR sensors for both biosensing and chemical sensing applications.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

Chemical Sensor Utilizing a Chemically Sensitive Electrode in Combination with Thin Diamond Layers

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel solid state chemical sensor using CVD diamond film. The system utilizes polycrystalline diamond technology combined with chemically-sensitive electrode layers to achieve high sensitivity and selectivity for a variety of chemical species.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503