Browse Technologies

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Prognostic Assay for High-altitude Pulmonary Hypertension in Cattle (Brisket Disease)

This genetic test identifies cattle at high risk of developing pulmonary hypertension at high altitudes (often called "brisket disease").  Brisket disease afflicts about 5% of cattle at high altitudes and the current predictive test for at-risk cattle is a measure of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP).  This current PAP test has some major drawbacks.  First, it is an invasive test.  Secondly, it is not accurate at lower elevations -- so at-risk cattle cannot identified before incurring the cost of transport to high altitude.  There is no treatment for the disease except prompt removal of the animal to lower elevations.  This technology measures genetic variants that confer susceptibility to brisket disease, and could be developed into a diagnostic or a prognostic test for use prior to shipping cattle to higher elevations or in breeding operations.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Agriculture: Control of Insect Populations via Wolbachia or Bacteriophage Tools

The insect microbiome is a rich resource that can explored to control insect reproduction and insect populations at large. Vanderbilt University has a collection of technologies available for such purposes, including bacteriophage therapies, Wolbachia genomic editing techniques and tools, and transgenic insect approaches.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Animal Health: Control of Insect Populations via Wolbachia or Bacteriophage Tools

The insect microbiome is a rich resource that can explored to control insect reproduction and insect populations at large. Vanderbilt University has a collection of technologies available for such purposes, including bacteriophage therapies, Wolbachia genomic editing techniques and tools, and transgenic insect approaches.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Composite Material for Tunable Memristance Behavior

This technology uses combinations of materials with different electronic properties of micro-or nanometerscale grain size to create a memristive device (twoterminal, variable resistance circuit element). Amidst growing interest in memristors, this technology is one of the first to use composite materials, which make the memristive qualities of the material tunable.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Gratings on Porous Silicon Structures for Sensing Applications

In this technology diffraction-based sensors made from porous materials are used for the detection of small molecules. The porous nature of the diffraction gratings that gives rise to an extremely large active sensing area enables a very high level of sensitivity. Specificity is achieved by functionalizing the porous gratings with selective binding species.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

Polar Liquid Crystals with High Dielectric Anisotropy

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a new class of liquid crystals with high dielectric anisotropy. A new class of liquid crystals containing boron in their structure has been developed with high dielectric anisotropy, which results in low threshold voltages.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

New Insect Repellants Disrupt Olfactory Cues: A Strategy for Pest Protection

A multinational research team, led by Dr. L. J. Zwiebel of Vanderbilt University, has identified new compounds with potential as insect repellents. These compounds work by capitalizing on knowledge of how insect odorant receptors detect and respond to scents. Medicinal chemistry efforts have yielded a number of novel compounds that could short-circuit the insect olfactory system, essentially by over-stimulation, to effectively mask attractive odors. These compounds could be used to repel nuisance and disease-carrying insects away from humans and animals, as well as repel agricultural pests from crops or food storage facilities. Vanderbilt University is seeking commercial partners to develop the technology for agricultural uses.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430

System for Transporting, Sorting, and Assembling Nanoscale Objects

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new system for transporting and sorting nanoscale and mesoscale particles and biomolecules. The system is able to achieve size-based sorting and captures/arranges the particles within a few seconds, which is significantly faster than the existing method of diffusion-based transport.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Justus Ndukaife

Actively Reconfigurable Metasurfaces for Dynamic Optical Components

Phase change materials (PCMs) are a fascinating class of materials that can change certain material properties (e.g., absorbance or reflectivity) upon the application of a stimulus. Researchers at Vanderbilt University have used a PCM to create a novel metamaterial that can be reconfigured for use in a wide range of potential optical and integrated photonic applications from the infrared to terahertz spectral domain.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067