Browse Technologies

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Real-time Detection of Position and Orientation of Wireless Endoscopy Capsule using Magnetic coupling

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new system to detect the position, orientation, and pressure exerted on surrounding tissues of a wireless capsule endoscopy device.  Magnetic coupling is one of the few physical phenomena capable of transmitting actuation forces across a physical barrier.  Magnetic manipulation has the potential to make surgery less invasive, by allowing untethered miniature devices to enter the body through natural orifices or tiny incisions, and then maneuver with minimal disruption to healthy tissue.  In order to accomplish this goal, the pose (position and orientation) of the medical device must be available in real time.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Wireless Tissue Palpation for Minimally Invasive Robotic Surgery Techniques

Researchers in Vanderbilt University's STORM Lab have developed a wireless palpation device that uses magnetic coupling between two units to provide valuable feedback about tissue properties and potential abnormalities. The wireless capabilities of this technology make it ideally suited for minimally invasive surgery and natural orifice procedures, as the device does not require the use of a surgical port.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Gastrointestinal

Tentacle-Like Robots to Access Tight Spaces in Manufacturing and Medical Applications

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel method for enabling tentacle-like robots to reach into tight spaces in manufacturing or medical applications. This is useful for industrial inspection tasks, assembly of products like airplane wings with complex geometry, or making medical endoscopes reach places in the body they cannot reach today. The new invention involves routing actuation wires along a flexible arm through curved paths along the robot


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Grasping Applicator for Surgical Positioning (GRASP)

A team of Vanderbilt engineers and surgeons has developed a novel bone and tissue graft placement device, primarily for use in the nasal and skull base cavities. The device uses a unique grasping technique to provide control and finesse in the placement of such grafts in addition to combining the roles of multiple instruments into a single device. The clinical purpose of this tool is to provide surgeons with an instrument that can grasp, place, and manipulate rigid and non-rigid graft materials in a controlled manner for skull base reconstruction; such control is very desirable in order to recreate a sound bony barrier that separates the intracranial and extracranial spaces.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Pulsed Infrared Light for the Inhibition of Central Nervous System Neurons

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel method for contactless simulation of the central nervous system. This technique involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system. While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Catheter Having Temperature Controlled Anchor and Related Methods

Heart valve disease is the 3rd most prevalent source of cardiovascular disease, leading to approximately 20,000 deaths per year in the U.S. alone. Moreover, there are an estimated 41,000 mitral valve procedures performed in the U.S. each year. The only effective, long-term treatment for mitral valve disease is open-chest valve replacement surgery, which is highly undesirable for elderly patients. Thus, there is a pressing need to develop novel percutaneous strategies for treatment that will reduce the number of open-chest surgeries. David Merryman and colleagues have developed a new, combined catheter that uses cryo temperatures to adhere to moving mitral valve leaflets and radiofrequency ablation to alter the compliance of the leaflet tissue to prevent prolapse and regurgitation.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Medical Devices

Optical Spectroscopic Detection of Cell and Tissue Death

A method for differentiating malignant in vivo liver tissues from normal in vivo liver tissues of a living subject includes the steps of: (a) illuminating a first area and a second area of in vivo liver tissues of the living subject with a first excitation light, (b) measuring an intensity of fluorescent light emitted from each of the first area and the second area of in vivo liver tissues in response to the first excitation light as a function of wavelength so as to obtain a first and a second fluorescent spectra, respectively, (c) illuminating the first area and the second area of in vivo liver tissues with a second excitation light, (d) measuring an intensity of diffilse light reflected by each of the first area and the second area of in vivo liver tissues in response to the second excitation light as a function of wavelength so as to obtain a first and a second diffused reflectance spectra, respectively, and (e) identifying one of the first area and the second area of in vivo liver tissues as malignant liver tissues and the other one of the first area and the second area of in vivo liver tissues as nomial liver tissues, by comparing the first fluorescence spectrum and the second florescence spectrum, and comparing the first diffused reflection spectrum and the second diffused reflection spectrum.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Rapidly Adjustable Flexible Positioning Arm for Ultrasound Probe -Clinician's Third Hand

A Vanderbilt team led by anesthesiologist Dr. Rajnish Gupta has developed a rapidly adjustable flexible positioning arm that can precisely position the ultrasound probe in such a way that it can be adjusted and fine-tuned with the flip of a switch. Upon fixing the probe in position, both of the clinician's hands are free to perform ultrasound guided procedures without the need for a second person to hold the probe.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Medical Devices
Analgesic

Aliquot Delivery System

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel device for accurately delivering a small aliquot of liquid pharmaceutical agent to a treatment site. This system enables more precise dosage and eliminates expensive waste found in conventional methods.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

System and Method for Measuring of Lung Vascular Injury by Ultrasonic Velocity and Blood Impedance

The present invention is a method for assessing capillary permeability to determine vascular lung injury without requiring the injection of radioactive material or requiring the sampling of blood. The method includes measuring impedance and ultrasonic velocity of blood flow through a lung. A hypertonic bolus is injected into the blood flow, and measurements of the blood flow are taken to determine the ultrasonic velocity and the electrical impedance of the blood. These measurements are used to calculate the capillary transport quantity, which is the product of the reflection coefficient for movement of fluid across the capillary barrier and the filtration coefficient. The measured value of the capillary transport quantity can then be compared to a conventional capillary transport quantity for healthy lungs, and one can determine injury by a significant decrease in the measured capillary transport quantity as compared to the standard measurements. Furthermore, a comparison of the osmotic transient graphs of the plotted indicator curves can serve to acknowledge lung vascular injury. Lung injury can be determined from the measured data when the point of osmotic equilibrium (where the indicator curve crosses the baseline) is significantly delayed as compared to the point of osmotic equilibrium plotted for a healthy lung.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548