Browse Technologies

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Image-Guided Radio Frequency Ablation

The Biomedical Modeling Laboratory at Vanderbilt University has produced a method and apparatus for use during the collection and processing of physical space data during image-guided surgery. This technology provides a complete system for performing tissue ablations that includes a spatial probe, an ablation tool, and a computer processor. Using this technology, the surgeon is able to view the location of the ablation tool in the patient's medical images as well as the ablation zone of the instrument and the particular portion of the tissue to be ablated.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Devices

Inexpensive Disposable Hydro-Jet Capsule Robot for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low-Income Countries

Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While screening programs have had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality, the majority of cases occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Typically, screening for gastric and esophageal cancer is performed using a flexible endoscope; however, endoscopy resources for these settings are traditionally limited. With the development of an inexpensive, disposable system by Vanderbilt researchers, gastroscopy and colonoscopy can be facilitated in areas hampered by a lack of access to the appropriate means.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Method for Non-Invasive Complete Vascular Occlusion Using MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery

Researchers have developed a non-invasive method for creating vascular occlusions at specific locations within a vessel using magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS). The speed and efficacy of this approach is better than traditional vascular occlusion methods, and the method can be further enhanced through the use of phase shift nano-droplets. The approach is even applicable to large vessels that can be extremely challenging to ablate due to the heat sink effect. Ultimately, the ability to occlude selected vasculature could aid in the treatment of vascular malformations, hemorrhage control, and tumor devascularization.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Devices

Non-Invasive Bacterial Identification for Acute Otitis Media using Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an optical-based method for real-time characterization of middle ear fluid in order to diagnose acute otitis media, also knows as a middle ear infection. The present technique allows for quick detection and identification of bacteria and can also be applied to other biological fluids in vivo.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Real-time Detection of Position and Orientation of Wireless Endoscopy Capsule using Magnetic coupling

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new system to detect the position, orientation, and pressure exerted on surrounding tissues of a wireless capsule endoscopy device.  Magnetic coupling is one of the few physical phenomena capable of transmitting actuation forces across a physical barrier.  Magnetic manipulation has the potential to make surgery less invasive, by allowing untethered miniature devices to enter the body through natural orifices or tiny incisions, and then maneuver with minimal disruption to healthy tissue.  In order to accomplish this goal, the pose (position and orientation) of the medical device must be available in real time.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Rotary Planar Peristaltic Micropump (RPPM) and Rotary Planar Valve (RPV) for Microfluidic Systems

A Vanderbilt University research team led by Professor John Wikswo has developed low-cost, small-volume, metering peristaltic micropumps and microvalves. These pumps and valves can be used either as stand-alone devices incorporated into microfluidic subsystems, or as readily customized components for research or miniaturized point-of-care instruments, Lab-on-a-Chip devices, and disposable fluid delivery cartridges.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Self-Decoupled RF Coils for Optimized Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most important and versatile tools in the repertoire of diagnostics and medical imaging. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel, geometry independent, self-decoupling radiofrequency (RF) coil design that will allow MRI machines to generate images at a faster rate and with greater image quality.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Speculum-Free Diagnostic Probe for Optical Assessment of the Cervix

A new approach for obtaining less invasive optical measurements of the cervix has been developed that does not require the use of a speculum exam. This technology can visualize the cervix in vivo to find unique biomarkers that indicate various conditions such as preterm labor, cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and dysplasia.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Synthesis and Characterization of New Terpolymers

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel method for synthesizing a new class of terpolymers with tunable mechanical and chemical properties for coronary stent applications.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Tentacle-Like Robots to Access Tight Spaces in Manufacturing and Medical Applications

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel method for enabling tentacle-like robots to reach into tight spaces in manufacturing or medical applications. This is useful for industrial inspection tasks, assembly of products like airplane wings with complex geometry, or making medical endoscopes reach places in the body they cannot reach today. The new invention involves routing actuation wires along a flexible arm through curved paths along the robot


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices