Browse Technologies

Displaying 21 - 30 of 49


Bioresorbable RF Coils for Post-Surgical Monitoring by MRI

Vanderbilt researchers have developed bioresorbable RF coils to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for use in post-surgical monitoring.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Mark Does, John Rogers

Molecular Image Fusion: Cross-Modality Modeling and Prediction Software for Molecular Imaging

A research team at Vanderbilt University Mass Spectrometry Research Center has developed the Molecular Image Fusion software system, that by fusing spatial correspondence between histology and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) measurements and cross-modality modeling, can predict ion distributions in tissue at spatial resolutions that exceed their acquisition resolution. The prediction resolution can even exceed the highest spatial resolution at which IMS can be physically measured. This software has been successfully tested on different IMS datasets and can be extended to other imaging modalities like MRI, PET, CT, profilometry, ion mobility spectroscopy, and different forms of microscopy.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

Non-invasive Fiducial Marker for Imaging and Radiation Delivery in the Eye

A team of Vanderbilt researchers has developed a novel fiducial marker for use during radiosurgery of the eye. The fiducial is a non-invasive, comfortable method for performing registration of preoperative medical images and the radiotherapy target during therapy. The device aims to remove the need for existing invasive registration procedures, while still providing accurate localization to the clinician.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Speculum-Free Diagnostic Probe for Optical Assessment of the Cervix

A new approach for obtaining less invasive optical measurements of the cervix has been developed that does not require the use of a speculum exam. This technology can visualize the cervix in vivo to find unique biomarkers that indicate various conditions such as preterm labor, cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and dysplasia.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Self-Decoupled RF Coils for Optimized Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is one of the most important and versatile tools in the repertoire of diagnostics and medical imaging. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel, geometry independent, self-decoupling radiofrequency (RF) coil design that will allow MRI machines to generate images at a faster rate and with greater image quality.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Low-Cost Non-Invasive Handheld Ultrasound Device for Measuring Tissue Stiffness

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a hand-held device to quantitatively measure tissue stiffness for medical monitoring. This device is non-invasive, low-cost, and can be used at the point of care.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

A Method to Obtain Uniform Radio Frequency Fields in the Body for High Field MRI

Researchers at Vanderbilt have created a new approach to produce uniform radio frequency (RF) fields in the body during high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Existing high field MRI machines create non-uniform RF fields that lead to non-uniform sensitivity in the generated images, also referred to as "hot" and "cold" spots. These local variations interfere with the tissue contrast of the images that radiologists depend upon to make accurate diagnoses. By generating uniform RF fields in the body, this technology provides the benefits of high field MRI without the non-uniform RF fields.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Advanced Method for Data Corrections in Organ Deformation

A group of Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a solution that will correct for the mis-registration of image data in image-guided surgery. The solution uses software to correct for any mis-registration that is caused by the presence of intraoperative deformations. This invention helps to improve the performance and capabilities of image-guided surgery.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Imaging

Advanced Ultrasound Imaging for Kidney Stone Detection

The standard for kidney stone detection is through the use of computed tomography (CT). However, CT is expensive and delivers harmful ionizing radiation into the body. Ultrasound would be the ideal way to detect kidney stones except that it performs poorly in detecting and accurately sizing stones. Vanderbilt researchers inventors have developed a technique that is able to separate hard, mineralized material (i.e kidney stones) from soft tissue in a way that is both cheaper and safer than CT and performs better than conventional ultrasound imaging.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Assessment of Right Ventricular Function Using Contrast Echocardiography

Vanderbilt Medical Center researchers have developed a non-invasive and reproducible method of assessing right-ventricular function using contrast-echocardiography. The right-ventricular transit time (RVTT) measures the time needed for echocardiographic contrast to travel from the RV to the bifurcation of the main pulmonary artery. Coupled with the pulmonary transit time (PTT), the time needed for contrast to traverse the entire pulmonary circulation, RVTT is part of a family of diagnostic parameters that can report on RV-specific performance as well as the RV's function relative to that of the pulmonary circuit as a whole.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433