Browse Technologies

Displaying 1 - 10 of 43


Systems and Methods for Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissues (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technique for contactless simulation of the central nervous system.  This involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system.  While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system. This technology has been protected by a portfolio of issued patents.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Antimicrobial Compounds and Methods of Use Thereof

Vanderbilt researchers, led by Eric Skaar, Ph.D., have identified novel compounds that are antimicrobial. These compounds represent a first in class as they target a new bacterial pathway that has never been targeted as an antimicrobial strategy.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Therapeutics

BMX as a Molecular Target for Radiosensitizing Agents

Provided are methods for modulating the proliferation of cells and tissues. In some embodiments, the methods include administering to a subject an effective amount of a modulator of a biological activity of a bone marrow X kinase (Bmx) gene product. Also provided are methods for increasing the radiosensitivity of a target cell or tissue, methods for suppressing tumor growth, methods for inhibiting tumor blood vessel growth, and compositions that include modulators of a biological activity of a bone marrow X kinase (Bmx) gene product.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Therapeutics

Cell-Permeable Socs Proteins That Inhibit Cytokine-Induced Signaling

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a unique polypeptide using cell-penetrating SOCS polypeptides or SOCS sequences designed to inhibits cytokine signaling and thus prevent or treat inflammation or an inflammatory related disease such as diabetes. This strategy has been validated in NOD mice models for either induced or naturally occurring diabetes and have been efficacious.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430
Therapeutics

Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Chlamydia Pneumoniae

The technology provides a method for diagnosis of MS by detection of Chlamydia and treatment of MS by total eradication of Chlamydia. This technology provides for eradication of Chlamydia by a novel treatment of combining various anti-chlamydial agents directed at different phases of the chlamydial life cycle.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430
Therapeutics

FOXA1 as a Biomarker for Urinary Bladder Cancer

In 2009 over 70,000 American were diagnosed with urinary bladder cancer, and in that same year over 14,000 Americans died of bladder cancer. Low funding for bladder cancer helps explain the slow progress in both the identification of biomarkers and the development of new treatments for metastatic bladder cancer. Nonetheless, novel diagnostic biomarkers are needed to aid in the early identification of patients with bladder cancer, and also to determine which patients are likely to progress. Vanderbilt researchers have identified such a biomarker whose expression is reduced and lost during progression of bladder cancer.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Infectious Diseases

Using human B cell hybridoma creation, and antibody engineering technologies, Dr. James E Crowe Jr.'s laboratory has developed an array of antibodies from full length human antibodies to Fab fragments and diabodies. Many of these antibodies are ready for a cooperate partner who can further develop these antibodies into biologic herapeutics. The table below is a sample of the antibodies they are currently researching and have available. In addition to these areas of research, Dr. Crowe is actively seeking collaborative opportunities to identify new interesting targets for future antibody engineering projects.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Inhibition of Selected microRNAs May Induce Atherosclerosis Regression, Particularly in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

A research project to identify microRNAs (miRs) as biomarkers for atherosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease is now exploiting an antisense microRNA (anti-miR) therapeutic strategy directed to the inhibition of either one or two target miRs in combination.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Cardiovascular

Inhibitors of Inward-Rectifying Potassium Channels (Insecticide)

This research targets IRK.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852

Mammalian Genes Involved in Viral Infection and Tumor Suppression

Scientists at Vanderbilt developed a method of identifying of genes, which are necessary for viral growth in cells but nonessential for cellular survival, as well as the methods of treating viral infections based on modification of the function of such genes. The identification of such genes involves the creation of random mutations in single cellular genes by a method which allows the subsequent identification of the mutated gene; selection of cells which remain virus-free after exposure to virus by a method for selectively eliminating persistently infected cells; and subsequent identification of the single mutated gene which precluded viral infection. This invention can be used for identification of host proteins critical for single or multiple virus infection, identification of new molecular targets for antiviral agents and screening of novel antiviral agents.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430