Browse Technologies

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Adaptive PCR: A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions

A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions. By directly monitoring the hybridization of fluorescently labelled L-DNA mimics of the template DNA strands and primers, it is possible to improve the efficiency of PCR in challenging conditions. This approach eliminates some of the sample preparation and trial and error that would otherwise be required for difficult sample types such as urine or other samples that contain high levels of salts.  In addition, this approach enables on-demand PCR in most any environment.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Research Reagent

Non-Invasive Skin Cancer Detection using Raman Spectroscopy-OCT System (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt University researchers have designed a system for non-invasive discrimination between normal and cancerous skin lesions. The system combines the depth-resolving capabilities of OCT technique with Raman Spectroscopy's specificity of molecular chemistry. By linking both imagining techniques into a single detector arm, the complexity, cost, and size of previously reported RS-OCT instruments have been significantly improved. The combined instrument is capable of acquiring data sets that allow for more thorough assessment of a sample than existing optical techniques.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Systems and Methods for Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissues (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technique for contactless simulation of the central nervous system.  This involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system.  While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system. This technology has been protected by a portfolio of issued patents.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Breast Tumor Margin Detection System Using Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a technology that uses spatially offset Raman spectroscopy to obtain depth-resolved information from the margins of tumors. This helps to determine positive or negative tumor margins in applications such as breast lumpectomy, and the technology is currently being investigated for breast cancer margin detection.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Point of Care Rheological Assay for Sickle Cell Disease

Vanderbilt researchers have created a novel technology for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease states using the rheological properties of a blood sample with a lateral flow membrane.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Low-cost, Normally Closed Microfluidic Valve

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a normally closed valve that is able to provide selective movement of small fluid quantities in a microfluidic device. The present microfluidic valve can be actuated using a simple rotating drivehead and mechanical support, greatly simplifying the valve design.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Targeting microRNAs as a Treatment for Vascular Disease

Vanderbilt researchers have identified a highly expressed microRNA crucial in angiotensin induced hypertension; and developed a therapeutic strategy that focuses on local or systemic administration of antisense microRNA to inhibit microRNA expression as treatment for vascular diseases. Promising data in animal models reveals that the inhibition of such microRNA not only prevents fibrosis but also reverses previously established aortic stiffening.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Wireless Tablet Application for Remote Collaboration and Training in Colonoscopy

Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. During patient screenings for populations at risk, polyp detection rates depend on the endoscopist's ability to identify the lesions, which takes years of practice and training. Endoscopic training can be challenging for the trainee and preceptor. Frustration can result from ineffective communication regarding areas of interest. Our team developed a novel tablet application for real-time mirroring of the colonoscopy examination that allows preceptors to make annotations directly on the viewing monitor that facilitates medical training and enables collaboration among several endoscopists during a procedure.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

I-Wire: A Biotension Measurement Device for Tissue Engineering and Pharmacology

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an integrated system ("I-Wire") for the growth of miniature, engineered 3D cardiac or other muscle or connective tissues and their active and passive mechanical characterization. The system utilizes an inverted microscope to measure the strain when the tissue constructs are laterally displaced using a calibrated flexible cantilevered probe.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Near-Infrared Dye with Large Stokes Shift for Simultaneous Multichannel in vivo Molecular Imaging

Fluorescent labels having near-infrared (NIR) emission wavelengths have the ability to penetrate tissue deeper than other emission wavelengths, providing enormous potential for non-invasive imaging applications. However, advancement of optical imaging (particularly NIR imaging) is hindered by the limitation of narrow Stokes shift of most infrared dyes currently available in the market. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel NIR dye (4-Sulfonir) for multichannel imaging that enables in vivo imaging of multiple targets due to its large Stokes shift. 4-Sulfonir with its unique large Stokes shift (~150 nm) and wide excitation spectrum could be used in parallel with other NIR dyes for imaging two molecular events simultaneously in one target.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548