Browse Technologies

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17


Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Composite Material for Tunable Memristance Behavior

This technology uses combinations of materials with different electronic properties of micro-or nanometerscale grain size to create a memristive device (twoterminal, variable resistance circuit element). Amidst growing interest in memristors, this technology is one of the first to use composite materials, which make the memristive qualities of the material tunable.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Gratings on Porous Silicon Structures for Sensing Applications

In this technology diffraction-based sensors made from porous materials are used for the detection of small molecules. The porous nature of the diffraction gratings that gives rise to an extremely large active sensing area enables a very high level of sensitivity. Specificity is achieved by functionalizing the porous gratings with selective binding species.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

Polar Liquid Crystals with High Dielectric Anisotropy

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a new class of liquid crystals with high dielectric anisotropy. A new class of liquid crystals containing boron in their structure has been developed with high dielectric anisotropy, which results in low threshold voltages.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

One-Step Hydrosilylation for Click Chemistry Compatible Surfaces

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a one-step hydrosilylation synthesis of azide surfaces for the preparation of click chemistry compatible substrates. In this process, an organic azide is formed in a single step on a hydrogen-terminated silicon support, yielding a surface that is ready to undergo click reactions as desired. Simple, efficient, and versatile, click chemistry is widely used and is particularly useful for biosensing applications. A click reaction can be utilized to attach a molecular or biological probe for point-of-care diagnostics and chemical screening.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Nanoporous Atomically Thin Graphene Membranes for Desalination & Nanofiltration

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an atomically thin membrane with extremely high selectivity and permeability for use in desalination and nanofiltration applications.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Nanoporous Atomically Thin Breathable Personal Protective Membranes

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an atomically thin membrane with extremely high selectivity and permeability for use in personal protective equipment.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

System for Transporting, Sorting, and Assembling Nanoscale Objects

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new system for transporting and sorting nanoscale and mesoscale particles and biomolecules. The system is able to achieve size-based sorting and captures/arranges the particles within a few seconds, which is significantly faster than the existing method of diffusion-based transport.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Justus Ndukaife

High-Performance Anti-Fouling, Anti-Wetting Membrane for Wastewater Distillation

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel membrane for membrane distillation that is resistant to both fouling and wetting and can be used to treat highly contaminated saline wastewater.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Actively Reconfigurable Metasurfaces for Dynamic Optical Components

Phase change materials (PCMs) are a fascinating class of materials that can change certain material properties (e.g., absorbance or reflectivity) upon the application of a stimulus. Researchers at Vanderbilt University have used a PCM to create a novel metamaterial that can be reconfigured for use in a wide range of potential optical and integrated photonic applications from the infrared to terahertz spectral domain.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067