Browse Technologies

Displaying 1 - 10 of 18


Polar Liquid Crystals with High Dielectric Anisotropy

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a new class of liquid crystals with high dielectric anisotropy. A new class of liquid crystals containing boron in their structure has been developed with high dielectric anisotropy, which results in low threshold voltages.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Incorporating Quantum Dots into Additive Manufacturing Processes

Recent studies have shown the benefits that nanocomposite materials have over unmodified materials in regard to mechanical, chemical, and optical properties. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a technique for the incorporation of quantum dots into polymers for use in additive manufacturing processes. The process has been used to create a nanocomposite material with unique absorbance, fluorescence, and ultraviolet (UV) light excitation properties.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Gratings on Porous Silicon Structures for Sensing Applications

In this technology diffraction-based sensors made from porous materials are used for the detection of small molecules. The porous nature of the diffraction gratings that gives rise to an extremely large active sensing area enables a very high level of sensitivity. Specificity is achieved by functionalizing the porous gratings with selective binding species.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

Composite Material for Tunable Memristance Behavior

This technology uses combinations of materials with different electronic properties of micro-or nanometerscale grain size to create a memristive device (twoterminal, variable resistance circuit element). Amidst growing interest in memristors, this technology is one of the first to use composite materials, which make the memristive qualities of the material tunable.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Ultrasonic Sensor for Non-intrusive Local Temperature, Transient Temperature and Heat Flux Measurements

An apparatus for measuring the temperature and heat flux of materials through the use of an ultrasonic sensor has been developed at Vanderbilt University. The sensor uses acoustic measurement techniques to determine the heat flux and temperature of material surfaces otherwise inaccessible in particular during system operation in order to enhance monitoring capabilities and reduce unsafe or impaired function due to extreme temperatures.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Electrochemically Actuated Optical Modulator

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a novel approach for creating dynamic, tunable reflective color displays using an electrochemical modulator. The technology can be implemented into devices requiring low power reflective color displays, such as smart watches and e-readers, and is adaptable for spectral control across a broad spectrum of frequencies from the visible to the far infrared. This technology provides a low power, tunable approach for modulating the optical properties of a material.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Actively Reconfigurable Metasurfaces for Dynamic Optical Components

Phase change materials (PCMs) are a fascinating class of materials that can change certain material properties (e.g., absorbance or reflectivity) upon the application of a stimulus. Researchers at Vanderbilt University have used a PCM to create a novel metamaterial that can be reconfigured for use in a wide range of potential optical and integrated photonic applications from the infrared to terahertz spectral domain.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

A Surfactant Based Low Molecular Weight Hydrogelator with Unprecedented Stability

Low molecular weight hydrogelator (LMHG) formulations are rare, but are preferred over polymeric hydrogels because of their improved biodegradability, biocompatibility and disintegration. Unfortunately, existing LMHGs often fall apart under slight environmental changes, seriously limiting their utility. However, the novel LMHG presented here is able to gelate >95% water in both acidic and basic forms, is robust to environmental changes, and has promising utility in controlled drug release, RNA delivery, tissue engineering, cosmetics, cancer therapy, biomaterials and other chemical industries, making it a promising new material for many different industries.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

High-Performance Anti-Fouling, Anti-Wetting Membrane for Wastewater Distillation

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel membrane for membrane distillation that is resistant to both fouling and wetting and can be used to treat highly contaminated saline wastewater.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067