Browse Technologies

Displaying 1 - 10 of 19


Polar Liquid Crystals with High Dielectric Anisotropy

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a new class of liquid crystals with high dielectric anisotropy. A new class of liquid crystals containing boron in their structure has been developed with high dielectric anisotropy, which results in low threshold voltages.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Incorporating Quantum Dots into Additive Manufacturing Processes

Recent studies have shown the benefits that nanocomposite materials have over unmodified materials in regard to mechanical, chemical, and optical properties. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a technique for the incorporation of quantum dots into polymers for use in additive manufacturing processes. The process has been used to create a nanocomposite material with unique absorbance, fluorescence, and ultraviolet (UV) light excitation properties.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Gratings on Porous Silicon Structures for Sensing Applications

In this technology diffraction-based sensors made from porous materials are used for the detection of small molecules. The porous nature of the diffraction gratings that gives rise to an extremely large active sensing area enables a very high level of sensitivity. Specificity is achieved by functionalizing the porous gratings with selective binding species.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

Composite Material for Tunable Memristance Behavior

This technology uses combinations of materials with different electronic properties of micro-or nanometerscale grain size to create a memristive device (twoterminal, variable resistance circuit element). Amidst growing interest in memristors, this technology is one of the first to use composite materials, which make the memristive qualities of the material tunable.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Ultrasonic Sensor for Non-intrusive Local Temperature, Transient Temperature and Heat Flux Measurements

An apparatus for measuring the temperature and heat flux of materials through the use of an ultrasonic sensor has been developed at Vanderbilt University. The sensor uses acoustic measurement techniques to determine the heat flux and temperature of material surfaces otherwise inaccessible in particular during system operation in order to enhance monitoring capabilities and reduce unsafe or impaired function due to extreme temperatures.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Actively Reconfigurable Metasurfaces for Dynamic Optical Components

Phase change materials (PCMs) are a fascinating class of materials that can change certain material properties (e.g., absorbance or reflectivity) upon the application of a stimulus. Researchers at Vanderbilt University have used a PCM to create a novel metamaterial that can be reconfigured for use in a wide range of potential optical and integrated photonic applications from the infrared to terahertz spectral domain.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

High Performance Nanofiltration Membranes

A research team led by Professor Shihong Lin at Vanderbilt University has developed a novel method to enhance the performance of nanofiltration (NF) membrane. This new approach has three major benefits:1) uses a class of additives that is low-cost and widely available2) is readily compatible with existing manufacturing infrastructure3) achieves ultra-sharp selectivity or enhanced perm-selectivity


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Lanthanide Oxide Nanoparticle Film Deposition Process

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a method for forming a film of lanthanide oxide nanoparticles using electrophoretic deposition. This technique is straightforward to set up and provides thickness control at high deposition rates, enabling site selective particle assembly for any size and shape.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Porous Materials with Active Sites Created via In-Pore Synthesis

Vanderbilt researchers have synthesized porous adsorbent materials for the capture of toxic industrial chemicals. These adsorbent materials have finely dispersed reactive sites that allow for higher adsorption capacities than existing materials. They can be used in filters for the military, homeland security, first responders, and for a wide range of industrial and commercial catalysts to capture toxic gases such as ammonia and sulfur dioxide.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067