Browse Technologies

Displaying 1 - 10 of 17


3D Junction Bipolar Membranes: More Efficient and Reliable Electrodialysis

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a unique membrane material for more efficient and reliable eletrodialysis. By utilizing a 3D junction structure, the nanofiber bipolar membrane does not degrade or delaminate during high current passage unlike commercial 2D membranes that are currently available.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Electrospun Filter Media:Effective Removal of Salt Aerosols

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a specialized filter media to remove salt aerosols from the air. The filter media is able to be merged with other filter components to create a single filter for separating multiple types of airborne particles. Using the developed filter media provides more versatility and functionality to the manufacturing of filters for air and molecular purification products.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Porous Materials with Active Sites Created via In-Pore Synthesis

Vanderbilt researchers have synthesized porous adsorbent materials for the capture of toxic industrial chemicals. These adsorbent materials have finely dispersed reactive sites that allow for higher adsorption capacities than existing materials. They can be used in filters for the military, homeland security, first responders, and for a wide range of industrial and commercial catalysts to capture toxic gases such as ammonia and sulfur dioxide.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Composite Material for Tunable Memristance Behavior

This technology uses combinations of materials with different electronic properties of micro-or nanometerscale grain size to create a memristive device (twoterminal, variable resistance circuit element). Amidst growing interest in memristors, this technology is one of the first to use composite materials, which make the memristive qualities of the material tunable.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Direct Imprinting of Porous Substrates

This easily adoptable technology consists of an inexpensive and reproducible method to imprint micron and sub-micron features into porous materials by pressing a reusable stamp directly into the porous material. This method of direct imprinting (DIP™) has the potential to enable an entirely new class of low-cost porous nanomaterial based devices.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

Easy-to-Fabricate, Cost-Effective, and Stable Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Substrates

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate with demonstrated signal amplification over one order of magnitude greater than commercially available SERS substrates. Very significantly, the newly developed substrates utilize a simple inexpensive imprinting process on nanoporous gold and are thus amenable for high-volume production.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

Ferroelectric Nanofluids for Piezoelectric and Electro-Optic Uses

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have developed a new method of producing microscale and nanoscale ferroelectric fluids. These particles are useful in a variety of piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and electrooptic devices such as thin-film capacitors, electronic transducers, actuators, high-k dielectrics, pyroelectric sensors, and optical memories.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Gratings on Porous Silicon Structures for Sensing Applications

In this technology diffraction-based sensors made from porous materials are used for the detection of small molecules. The porous nature of the diffraction gratings that gives rise to an extremely large active sensing area enables a very high level of sensitivity. Specificity is achieved by functionalizing the porous gratings with selective binding species.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

Nanostructured Molybdenum (IV) disulfide (MoS2) Electrodes

The most common counter electrode materials used for in Quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) quickly become poisoned by sulfide, resulting in significant current drops, which lowers solar cell efficiencies and makes them unsuitable for long-term use in a device. Also, some of these materials are rare and expensive, so replacing them with an inexpensive, earth-abundant material is a desirable goal. This invention uses a Mo foil to produce the desired uniform growth of Molybdenum (IV) disulfide (MoS2) petals from the Mo foil, making the foil both the source of Mo as well as the substrate. This petaled MoS2 electrode shows a vastly improved polysulfide reduction compared to Glassy Carbon, ordinary Mo foil, Pt and Au. The petaled MoS2 electrode lost only 0.63% of its initial current density at -1 V whereas Pt lost 13.58% after only five scans, indicating the petaled MoS2 films are highly stable as cathodes. The technology was tested in a solar device setting, using standard photoanodes to test the efficiency of a device employing petaled MoS2 as its cathode. Devices in which a petaled MoS2 cathode was used achieved nearly fivefold improvement in efficiency over those employing a Pt cathode.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433