Browse Technologies

Displaying 1 - 9 of 9


Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

High Inertance Liquid Piston Engine-Compressor

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a high inertance engine-compressor for use with pneumatically actuated devices, especially those with periods of inactivity between periods of pneumatic use. It utilizes a flexible diaphragm in combination with a liquid piston to achieve high inertance and other operational features such as high efficiency, low noise and low temperature operation.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Energy

Improved Biomanufacturing Using Biological Clock Control for High Yield/Low Cost Bioproduct

A team of researchers at Vanderbilt University has developed a method of manipulating the circadian clock of cyanobacteria. This biological manipulation is used to increase gene expression in target genes that produce biofuel and high-value bioproducts, such as pharmaceuticals and cosmetics from precursor-expressing genes. Altering the circadian rhythm in the bacteria provides an improved approach to bioproduct development on a large scale using sunlight as a zero--cost energy solution.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Nanostructured Molybdenum (IV) Disulfide (MoS2) Electrodes for use in Solar Cells

Quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are a widely studied system for harvesting light and converting it to electrical energy. Quantum dots (QDs) are an attractive photoabsorber because they have large absorption coefficients and their energy of absorption in the visible region can be tuned based on their size. Molybdenum (IV) disulfide (MoS2) is a naturally occurring semiconductor found in nature as the mineral molybdenite that can be synthesized from inexpensive, earth-abundant materials for use in solar cells.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Electrochemically Actuated Optical Modulator

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a novel approach for creating dynamic, tunable reflective color displays using an electrochemical modulator. The technology can be implemented into devices requiring low power reflective color displays, such as smart watches and e-readers, and is adaptable for spectral control across a broad spectrum of frequencies from the visible to the far infrared. This technology provides a low power, tunable approach for modulating the optical properties of a material.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

"Anode-Free" Sodium Metal Battery

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new "anode-free" battery architecture for sodium-ion batteries that provide energy densities in excess of 400Wh/kg, which is greater than the maximum theoretical energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Inventors

Adam Cohn, Cary Pint
Energy

3D Junction Bipolar Membranes: More Efficient and Reliable Electrodialysis

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a unique membrane material for more efficient and reliable eletrodialysis. By utilizing a 3D junction structure, the nanofiber bipolar membrane does not degrade or delaminate during high current passage unlike commercial 2D membranes that are currently available.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

High Energy - Density Hydraulic Accumulator

Vanderbilt inventors propose an inexpensive and easy to manufacture hydraulic accumulator. The proposed hydraulic accumulator technology is intended for energy storage. It is superior to current alternatives in that it provides a simple, efficient and relatively cheap method for storing a large amount of energy in a relatively small volume and mass. One example of its application would be in regenerative braking of passenger vehicles (hydraulic hybrid).


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Energy

Monopropellant-Powered Actuator

This proportional actuator developed at Vanderbilt University is a superior source of controllable power for mobile robots. It utilizes monopropellant or hypergolic bipropellant fuel sources in a controlled manner for more efficient and effective untethered mobile robots performing human mechanical tasks over a prolonged period of time.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Energy