Browse Technologies

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A Novel Organs-On-Chip Platform

Vanderbilt researchers have created a new multi-organs-on-chip platform that comprises Perfusion Control systems, MicroFormulators, and MicroClinical Analyzers connected via fluidic networks. The real-time combination of multiple different solutions to create customized perfusion media and the analysis of the effluents from each well are both controlled by the intelligent use of a computer-operated system of pumps and valves. This permits, for the first time, a compact, low-cost system for creating a time-dependent drug dosage profile in a tissue system inside each well.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

I-Wire: A Biotension Measurement Device for Tissue Engineering and Pharmacology

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an integrated system ("I-Wire") for the growth of miniature, engineered 3D cardiac or other muscle or connective tissues and their active and passive mechanical characterization. The system utilizes an inverted microscope to measure the strain when the tissue constructs are laterally displaced using a calibrated flexible cantilevered probe.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Low-cost, Normally Closed Microfluidic Valve

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a normally closed valve that is able to provide selective movement of small fluid quantities in a microfluidic device. The present microfluidic valve can be actuated using a simple rotating drivehead and mechanical support, greatly simplifying the valve design.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Modular and Stackable Microfluidic Devices

Vanderbilt researchers have invented a modular microfluidic bioreactor that can be layered and stacked to create complex organ-on-chip systems that mimic the behavior of human organ systems such as the neurovascular unit. This modular device can also be assembled from separate, functioning biolayers, and at the end of a study disassembled for examination of individual cellular components.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Microfluidics

Organ-on-a-Chip System

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a group of microfluidic organ-on-chip devices that include perfusion controllers, microclinical analyzers, microformulators, and integrated microfluidic measurement chips. Together, these devices can measure and control multiple organ-on-chip systems in order to model the multi-organ physiology of humans.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Microfluidics

Method for Extracting Molecules From Tissues

This research targets molecular extraction.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Mass Spectrometry Tools
Research Reagent

Rotary planar peristaltic micropump (RPPM) and Rotary Planar Valve (RPV) for microfluidic systems

A research team led by Professor John Wikswo of Vanderbilt University has developed a low-cost, small-volume, metering peristaltic micro pumps and microvalves. They can be either utilized as a stand-alone device, or incorporated into microfluidic subsystems for research instruments or miniaturized point-of-care instruments, Lab on a Chip devices, and disposable fluid delivery cartridges. The key advantage of this pump is that it can deliver flow rates as low as a few hundred nL/min to tens of µL/min against pressure heads as high as 20 psi, at approximately 1/10th the cost of stand-alone commercial syringe and peristaltic pumps. The RPV can implement complicated fluid control protocols and fluidic mixing without bulky pneumatic controllers. Both the RPPM and RPV can be readily optimized for particular applications.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Simultaneous RNA and Gene Expression Profiling Using Mass Spectrometry

This technology allows the simultaneous detection of RNA transcript abundance (as an assay of gene expression) and protein abundance (as an assay of protein expression) from biological samples without RNA isolation, labeling or amplification. Existing technologies allow for very efficient determinations of protein abundance from a wide variety of biological samples. These methods are in widespread use and are based on mass spectrometry technologies. There are no available technologies that allow efficient and quantitative assessment of multiple RNA transcripts without a previous isolation followed by labeling and/or amplification. The most efficient technologies currently available make use of DNA microarrays to profile RNA abundance as a measure of gene expression. While very robust and useful, these technologies are very labor intensive and suffer from a number of technological drawbacks. This technology takes advantage of a number of existing methods and techniques and brings them together in a novel manner that greatly expands the state of the art for gene expression.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

NanoBioReactor for Monitoring Small Cell Populations

NanoBioreactors recreate the microenvironments of normal tissue, non-adherent cells, tumor-infected tissue and wounded tissue in vitro. These microfabricated bioreactors provide independent control of chemokine and growth factor gradients, shear forces, cellular perfusion and the permeability of physical barriers to cellular migration. This fine control allows detailed optical and electrochemical observations of normal, immune and cancerous cells during activation, division, cell migration, intravasation, extravasation and angiogenesis.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Microfluidics

A System for Growing Small Populations of Living Cells and Monitoring Their Physiological State

This invention combines the microfluidic and microelectronic devices and techniques required for the microminiaturization of cell culture and cell measurement systems to allow monitoring the response of populations of 1 to several hundred living cells. The instrument(s) allows for the detection of extracellular, membrane, and intracellular parameters; and the incorporation of closed-loop control techniques to continuously monitor the health of the cell and adjust the environmental and pharmacological parameters that control the cell.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503