Browse Technologies

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Non-Invasive Bacterial Identification for Acute Otitis Media using Raman Spectroscopy

Real-time non-invasive Raman Sprectoscopy system to detect the presence and identity of pathogens involved in causing middle ear infections.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Non-Invasive Skin Cancer Detection using Raman Spectroscopy-OCT System (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt University researchers have designed a system for non-invasive discrimination between normal and cancerous skin lesions. The system combines the depth-resolving capabilities of OCT technique with Raman Spectroscopy's specificity of molecular chemistry. By linking both imagining techniques into a single detector arm, the complexity, cost, and size of previously reported RS-OCT instruments have been significantly improved. The combined instrument is capable of acquiring data sets that allow for more thorough assessment of a sample than existing optical techniques.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Systems and Methods for Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissues (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technique for contactless simulation of the central nervous system.  This involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system.  While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system. This technology has been protected by a portfolio of issued patents.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

MultiUse Multimodal Imaging Chelates

PK11195 is a high-affinity ligand of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). By linking lanthanide chelates to the PK11195 targeting moiety, Vanderbilt researchers have generated a range of PBR-targeted imaging probes capable of visualizing a number of disease states at cellular levels using a variety of imaging modalities (fl uorescence, PET and SPECT, MRI, electron microscopy).


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Medical Imaging

3DMD SmartCasting System

Vanderbilt University researchers have  developed a new approach to corrective serial casting, particularly for the treatment of clubfoot, that produces a custom fit to patient anatomy and therapeutic need.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790
Medical Imaging

A Method to Obtain Uniform Radio Frequency Fields in the Body for High Field MRI

Researchers at Vanderbilt have created a new approach to produce uniform radio frequency (RF) fields in the body during high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Existing high field MRI machines create non-uniform RF fields that lead to non-uniform sensitivity in the generated images, also referred to as "hot" and "cold" spots. These local variations interfere with the tissue contrast of the images that radiologists depend upon to make accurate diagnoses. By generating uniform RF fields in the body, this technology provides the benefits of high field MRI without the non-uniform RF fields.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

A Simple and Highly Portable Flow Phantom for Doppler Ultrasound Quality Measurements

A new phantom has been designed in which Doppler ultrasound measurements can be conducted for quality assurance purposes. The phantom is highly portable, does not require power to operate, and allows for simple and reproducible measurements of Doppler ultrasound function. This combination of advantages allows for realistic monthly, weekly, even daily Doppler QA measurements.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Assessment of Right Ventricular Function Using Contrast Echocardiography

Vanderbilt Medical Center researchers have developed a non-invasive and reproducible method of assessing right-ventricular function using contrast-echocardiography. The right-ventricular transit time (RVTT) measures the time needed for echocardiographic contrast to travel from the RV to the bifurcation of the main pulmonary artery. Coupled with the pulmonary transit time (PTT), the time needed for contrast to traverse the entire pulmonary circulation, RVTT is part of a family of diagnostic parameters that can report on RV-specific performance as well as the RV's function relative to that of the pulmonary circuit as a whole.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Breast Tumor Margin Detection System Using Spatially Offset Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a technology that uses spatially offset Raman spectroscopy to obtain depth-resolved information from the margins of tumors. This helps to determine positive or negative tumor margins in applications such as breast lumpectomy, and the technology is currently being investigated for breast cancer margin detection.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

COX2 Probes for Multimodal Imaging

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a novel chemical design and synthesis process for azulene-based COX2 contrast agents which can be used for molecular imaging, via a variety of imaging techniques. These COX2 probes can be utilized for numerous applications, including imaging cancers and inflammation caused by arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The process for developing these COX2 contrast agents has been significantly improved through a convergent synthesis process which reduces the required steps to establish the COX2 precursors.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Imaging