Browse Technologies

Displaying 81 - 90 of 241


Thermoresponsive Printer Filament for Tissue Engineering

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a thermoresponsive filament material for use in 3D printing that can be readily dissolved via cooling. This material has use in a multitude of different applications. One potential application is lost-wax casting for tissue engineering. The present material enables the user to print an intricate vascular structure, embed the structure in an engineered tissue construct, and then dissolve the printed structure to create a hollow vascular network embedded within the tissue construct.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

System for Transporting, Sorting, and Assembling Nanoscale Objects

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new system for transporting and sorting nanoscale and mesoscale particles and biomolecules. The system is able to achieve size-based sorting and captures/arranges the particles within a few seconds, which is significantly faster than the existing method of diffusion-based transport.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Justus Ndukaife

Improved Biomanufacturing Using Biological Clock Control for High Yield/Low Cost Bioproduct

A team of researchers at Vanderbilt University has developed a method of manipulating the circadian clock of cyanobacteria. This biological manipulation is used to increase gene expression in target genes that produce biofuel and high-value bioproducts, such as pharmaceuticals and cosmetics from precursor-expressing genes. Altering the circadian rhythm in the bacteria provides an improved approach to bioproduct development on a large scale using sunlight as a zero--cost energy solution.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Molecular Image Fusion: Cross-Modality Modeling and Prediction Software for Molecular Imaging

A research team at Vanderbilt University Mass Spectrometry Research Center has developed the Molecular Image Fusion software system, that by fusing spatial correspondence between histology and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) measurements and cross-modality modeling, can predict ion distributions in tissue at spatial resolutions that exceed their acquisition resolution. The prediction resolution can even exceed the highest spatial resolution at which IMS can be physically measured. This software has been successfully tested on different IMS datasets and can be extended to other imaging modalities like MRI, PET, CT, profilometry, ion mobility spectroscopy, and different forms of microscopy.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

Modular and Stackable Microfluidic Devices

Vanderbilt researchers have invented a modular microfluidic bioreactor that can be layered and stacked to create complex organ-on-chip systems that mimic the behavior of human organ systems such as the neurovascular unit. This modular device can also be assembled from separate, functioning biolayers, and at the end of a study disassembled for examination of individual cellular components.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Microfluidics

Miniature Magnetorheological Brake Technology

A team of Vanderbilt engineers have developed a miniature magnetorheological (MR) brake with a combination of high braking torque and a fast response time. With potential applicability over a wide spectrum of applications, the device was initially developed with robotic and haptic applications in mind.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

High-Performance Anti-Fouling, Anti-Wetting Membrane for Wastewater Distillation

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel membrane for membrane distillation that is resistant to both fouling and wetting and can be used to treat highly contaminated saline wastewater.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Systems and Methods for Non-destructive Evaluation of Optical Material Properties and Surfaces

A team of Vanderbilt researchers has developed a novel system and method for non-destructive characterization of compound lenses. The approach uses optical coherence tomography and reflectance confocal microscopy to fully characterize lens geometry and glass materials, enabling accurate modeling of compound lenses.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Imaging

Systems and Methods for Reduced End-face Reflection Back-Coupling in Fiber-Optics

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a technology for suppressing end-face reflections in most fiber optic components, thereby reducing a significant source of noise in fiber-optic systems. The solution employs a fused-spliced length of angle-polished no-core fiber in order to angle reflections outside the acceptance numerical aperture of the fiber and spatially offsetting any reflections to minimize back-coupling. The result is a compact solution that significant decreases noise without significantly altering the specifications of the fiber-optic component.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Non-invasive Fiducial Marker for Imaging and Radiation Delivery in the Eye

A team of Vanderbilt researchers has developed a novel fiducial marker for use during radiosurgery of the eye. The fiducial is a non-invasive, comfortable method for performing registration of preoperative medical images and the radiotherapy target during therapy. The device aims to remove the need for existing invasive registration procedures, while still providing accurate localization to the clinician.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067