Browse Technologies

Displaying 61 - 70 of 218


Transoral Lung Access Device

Transoral lung access is preferable to traditional needlebasedaccess due to the lower risk of lung collapse. However present bronchoscope-based devices enable access to only a small portion of the lung. The present device is a robotic image-guided bronchoscope to navigate the airway under closed-loop control to the target. IT is designed to provide transoral access to any location in the lung, particularly the hard-to-reach peripheral regions.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Two Degrees-of-Freedom, Fluid Power Stepper Actuator Model

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technology for use of a flexible fluidic actuator in MRI-guided surgical systems. This method eliminates the need for moving the patient out of the MRI machine, onto an operating table, and back in order to perform procedures. It is a safe, sterilized, and successful method to simplify MRI-guided surgical procedures.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505

Small Molecule mGlu3 NAMs as Therapeutics for CNS Disorders

The Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD) has a mission to promote the translation of advances in basic science towards novel therapeutics. They have recruited faculty and staff with experience at over 10 different pharmaceutical companies to ensure a diverse set of approaches, techniques and philosophies to advancing compounds. Together they aim to de-risk drug discovery programs.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics

mGlu3 NAMs as Therapeutics for Chemoresistant Tumors

Targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 3 (mGlu3) has been linked as a potential therapeutic to many neurological disorders and well as oncology through the use of dual specific mGlu2/3 Antagonists (LY341495, RO4491533, MGS0039, RO4988546).


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics

TagDock: An Efficient Rigid Body Molecular Docking Algorithm For Three Dimensional Models of Oligomeric Biomolecular Complexes With Limited Experimental Restraint Data

TagDock is an efficient rigid body molecular docking algorithm that generates three-dimensional models of oligomeric biomolecular complexes in instances where there is limited experimental restraint data to guide the docking calculations. Through "distance difference analysis" TagDock additionally recommends followup experiments to further discriminate divergent (score-degenerate) clusters of TagDock's initial solution models


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Early Detection of Implant Loosening

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a new technique for identifying implantloosening. The technique utilizes the analysis of synovial fluid as an early indicator of potential loosening of orthopedic implants.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Nanoporous Atomically Thin Breathable Personal Protective Membranes

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an atomically thin membrane with extremely high selectivity and permeability for use in personal protective equipment.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Nanoporous Atomically Thin Graphene Membranes for Desalination & Nanofiltration

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an atomically thin membrane with extremely high selectivity and permeability for use in desalination and nanofiltration applications.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

A Novel Organs-On-Chip Platform

Vanderbilt researchers have created a new multi-organs-on-chip platform that comprises Perfusion Control systems, MicroFormulators, and MicroClinical Analyzers connected via fluidic networks. The real-time combination of multiple different solutions to create customized perfusion media and the analysis of the effluents from each well are both controlled by the intelligent use of a computer-operated system of pumps and valves. This permits, for the first time, a compact, low-cost system for creating a time-dependent drug dosage profile in a tissue system inside each well.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

One-Step Hydrosilylation for Click Chemistry Compatible Surfaces

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a one-step hydrosilylation synthesis of azide surfaces for the preparation of click chemistry compatible substrates. In this process, an organic azide is formed in a single step on a hydrogen-terminated silicon support, yielding a surface that is ready to undergo click reactions as desired. Simple, efficient, and versatile, click chemistry is widely used and is particularly useful for biosensing applications. A click reaction can be utilized to attach a molecular or biological probe for point-of-care diagnostics and chemical screening.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503