Browse Technologies

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Lickometer: Instrument for measuring rodent drinking behavior

Researchers at Vanderbilt University designed an instrument capable of higher accuracy and analyzing lick microstructure compared to current available models. This device is compatible with classic ventilated home cages, making it easy to build and use with an intuitive touchscreen graphical user interface. The system tracks two-bottle choice licking behavior in up to 18 rodent cages, or 36 single bottles, on a minute-to-minute timescale controlled by a single Arduino microcontroller. Ultimately, the system measures drinking preference over time and changes in bout microstructure, with undisturbed recordings lasting up to 7 days.


Licensing Contact

Greg Pawel

615.343.0996

Small Molecule-GIRK Potassium Channel Modulators That Are Anxiolytic Therapeutics

The G-protein activated, inward-rectifying potassium (K+) channels, "GIRKs", are a family of ion channels that has been the focus of intense research interest for nearly two decades. GIRK has been shown to play important roles in the pathophysiology of diseases such as anxiety, epilepsy, Down's syndrome, pain perception and drug addiction. Here scientists at Vanderbilt developed the first truly potent, effective, and selective GIRK activator, ML297 (VU0456810) and demonstrated that ML297 is active in animal models of epilepsy. While the group is using ML297 to continue to explore the therapeutic benefits of GIRK modulation, they are continuing to develop more selective and druggable GIRK inhibitors from different scaffolds.


Licensing Contact

Cameron Sargent

615.322.5907
Therapeutics
Analgesic
Small Molecule

Diagnostics Management Team

The sheer volume of medical information available to physicians today is overwhelming. Diagnostic Management Team provides a concise, accurate method for ordering the correct diagnostic tests every time, and it returns the results in a uniform report format, easily read by the physician. This has already been launched within Vanderbilt University, with a high adoption rate amongst physicians and has already shown significant savings.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Mary Zutter
Oncology

Use of Fluid Shear Stress Treatment to Enhance T Cell Activation

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have developed a technique to enhance immune cell activation by exposing cells to mechanical force while culturing. Proof-of-concept data indicate that activating immune cells with this method may improve therapeutic efficacy and reduce manufacturing expenses, making powerful CAR T cell therapies more accessible to patients in need.


Licensing Contact

Cameron Sargent

615.322.5907

Targeted photodynamic therapy for S. aureus infections

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a combination photodynamic therapy (PDT) for targeting MRSA infections in skin that is not only effective but also HIGHLY SPECIFIC and LESS SUSCEPTIBLE TO RESISTANCE, adding a much needed therapy to our quickly depleting arsenal against this pathogen.


Licensing Contact

Cameron Sargent

615.322.5907

Miniature Magnetorheological Brake Technology

A team of Vanderbilt engineers have developed a miniature magnetorheological (MR) brake with a combination of high braking torque and a fast response time. With potential applicability over a wide spectrum of applications, the device was initially developed with robotic and haptic applications in mind.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

One-Step Hydrosilylation for Click Chemistry Compatible Surfaces

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a one-step hydrosilylation synthesis of azide surfaces for the preparation of click chemistry compatible substrates. In this process, an organic azide is formed in a single step on a hydrogen-terminated silicon support, yielding a surface that is ready to undergo click reactions as desired. Simple, efficient, and versatile, click chemistry is widely used and is particularly useful for biosensing applications. A click reaction can be utilized to attach a molecular or biological probe for point-of-care diagnostics and chemical screening.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

An Imaging Approach to Detect Parathyroid Gland Health During Endocrine Surgery

Vanderbilt researchers have designed a laser speckle imaging device to detect parathyroid gland viability during endocrine surgery, during which otherwise healthy parathyroid glands are prone to devascularization leading to long-term hypocalcemia. Currently, the surgeon must use his or her best judgement regarding the health of the parathyroid gland. This technology removes the guess work from the decision and provides a real-time assessment of the parathyroid viability.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

New Optical Tweezers for Rapid Control of Nanoscale Objects

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technology for trapping and dynamically manipulating nanoscale objects. Control over miniature objects like proteins can aid in applications such as biological sensing, single molecule analysis, and size-based sorting of nanoscale objects.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Justus Ndukaife

PIQASO: A rigid phantom for comprehensive end-to-end evaluation of online adaptive radiotherapy systems

There is currently no radiotherapy phantom capable of quantitatively assessing all components of an online adaptive radiotherapy (online ART) system in a comprehensive end-to-end test.Represented here is a novel, rigid phantom that can simultaneously evaluate an online ART system's image acquisition, deformable image registration, contour propagation, plan re-optimization, dose calculation, and beam delivery in a single process that is robust, quantitative, and convenient.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548