Browse Technologies

Displaying 51 - 60 of 218


Minimally Invasive Telerobotic Platform for Transurethral Exploration and Intervention

This technology, developed in Vanderbilt University's Advanced Robotics and Mechanism Applications Laboratory, uses a minimally invasive telerobotic platform to perform transurethral procedures, such as transurethral resection. This robotic device provides high levels of precision and dexterity that improve patient outcomes in transurethral procedures.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices
Genitourinary

Model-based Compression Correction Framework for Ultrasound

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a system that corrects for compressional effects in ultrasound data during soft tissue imaging. The system uses tracking and digitization information to detect the pose of the ultrasound probe during imaging, and then couples this information with a biomechanical model of the tissue to correct compressional effects during intraoperative imaging.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Near-Infrared Dye with Large Stokes Shift for Simultaneous Multichannel in vivo Molecular Imaging

Fluorescent labels having near-infrared (NIR) emission wavelengths have the ability to penetrate tissue deeper than other emission wavelengths, providing enormous potential for non-invasive imaging applications. However, advancement of optical imaging (particularly NIR imaging) is hindered by the limitation of narrow Stokes shift of most infrared dyes currently available in the market. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel NIR dye (4-Sulfonir) for multichannel imaging that enables in vivo imaging of multiple targets due to its large Stokes shift. 4-Sulfonir with its unique large Stokes shift (~150 nm) and wide excitation spectrum could be used in parallel with other NIR dyes for imaging two molecular events simultaneously in one target.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

New Molecules Clear Chronic Infections by Disrupting Bacterial Energy Production Pathways

New compounds developed at Vanderbilt demonstrate a unique mechanism of broad spectrum activity to stymy antibacterial resistance. The compounds are particularly useful in chronic infections where long term antibiotic therapy fails, because it specifically kills "small colony variants" -- the bacteria that have developed resistance mechanisms. These compounds show promise in treating Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), and in overcoming difficult-to-treat infections in bone in cystic fibrosis patients. These compounds could be combined with new (and old) antimicrobial drugs to outwit resistant bacterial infections.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Therapeutics

NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) in Water

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a method to perform the Parahydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) based method of Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) in aqueous media. This allows the resulting hyperpolarized molecules to be used for in vivo applications.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Novel anti-platelet therapy for treatment of thrombosis, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular injury

One of the leading causes of deaths in developed countries is related to thromboembolism. PAR-4 (protease activated receptor-4) is one of two receptors on the human platelet that respond to thrombin, the central enzyme of coagulation.  Researchers here at Vanderbilt University have developed novel antagonists of PAR-4 that could be beneficial for patients allowing for normal hemostasis during treatment for thrombotic events.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Cardiovascular

Precision Pneumatic Robot for MRI-Guided Neurosurgery

At Vanderbilt University, a robotic steering mechanism for MRI-guided neurosurgical ablation has been developed. The small robot has submilimeter precision and is fully MRI compatible. It aims to replace current surgical practices with minimally invasive procedures in order to enhance the treatment of cancer and numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Medical Devices

Small Molecule Mediated Transcriptional Induction of E-Cadherin and Inhibition of Epithelial-to-mesenchymal Transition


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Oncology

System and Methods for Contact Detection and Localization in Continuum Robots

This technology expands the capabilities of continuum robots with a system and method that enables them to detect instances of contact and to estimate the position of the contact. This framework allows the motion of the robot to be constrained so as to ensure the robot doesn't damage itself, another robot arm, or surrounding environments. Applications for this technology include enhanced safe telemanipulation for multi-arm continuum robots in surgery, micro-assembly in confined spaces, and exploration in unknown environments.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

System and Methods of Using Image-guidance for Placement of Cochlear Stimulator Devices, Drug Carrier Devices, or the Like

Vanderbilt inventors have developed and tested a device (C-in) and method that would shift the current invasive, risky surgical procedure of cochlear implantation to a less invasive outpatient procedure.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505