Browse Technologies

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Small Molecule Mediated Transcriptional Induction of E-Cadherin and Inhibition of Epithelial-to-mesenchymal Transition


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Oncology

Through the Tool Tracking for Friction Stir Welding

Utilizing force sensors mounted on the friction stir welding tool, Vanderbilt inventors have developed a technique to keep a weld tool on track. This technology is especially benefi cial in real time corrections for deviations in travel in the case of robotic FSW or ""blind"" welds. The technique is cost- effective in that no additional sensors such as cameras, thermocouples, acoustic emission receivers, etc. are required.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Energy

Novel anti-platelet therapy for treatment of thrombosis, cardiovascular disease, and cerebrovascular injury

One of the leading causes of deaths in developed countries is related to thromboembolism. PAR-4 (protease activated receptor-4) is one of two receptors on the human platelet that respond to thrombin, the central enzyme of coagulation.  Researchers here at Vanderbilt University have developed novel antagonists of PAR-4 that could be beneficial for patients allowing for normal hemostasis during treatment for thrombotic events.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852
Therapeutics
Cardiovascular

Load-Bearing Energy Storage Composites from Porous Materials and Methods for Production Thereof

A team of Vanderbilt engineers has developed a multifunctional, loadbearing solid-state supercapacitor to simultaneously store energy and withstand static and dynamic mechanical stresses.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Energy

Marker Enrichment Modeling (MEM) Software for Automated Cell Population Characterization and Identification in Complex Tissue Microenvironments

Marker enrichment modeling (MEM) provides a crucial missing piece for true machine learning analysis of cell identities and phenotypes in complex tissue microenvironments, including human immune disorders and cancer.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Wireless Tablet Application for Remote Collaboration and Training in Colonoscopy

Colorectal cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world. During patient screenings for populations at risk, polyp detection rates depend on the endoscopist's ability to identify the lesions, which takes years of practice and training. Endoscopic training can be challenging for the trainee and preceptor. Frustration can result from ineffective communication regarding areas of interest. Our team developed a novel tablet application for real-time mirroring of the colonoscopy examination that allows preceptors to make annotations directly on the viewing monitor that facilitates medical training and enables collaboration among several endoscopists during a procedure.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Core and Side Cut Biopsy Device

Vanderbilt researchers have created a novel device for tissue biopsy. By combining the advantages of a core biopsy device and a FNA needle, this device is designed to combine the advantages of improving the accuracy of biopsies from small targets during CT or ultrasound guided biopsies.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Endonasal Surgical Robot for Sinus and Neurosurgery

Vanderbilt engineers have developed a robotic system for performing sinus and neurosurgery through the nose. This provides a less invasive way to access surgical sites in the sinuses and near the middle of the patient's head, leading to faster recovery times. The robot is modular and sterilizable with detachable cartridge-based instruments. Each instrument is a concentric tube robot, which is a needle-sized tool that can bend and elongate. The system delivers four of these instruments through a single nostril.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Near-Infrared Dye with Large Stokes Shift for Simultaneous Multichannel in vivo Molecular Imaging

Fluorescent labels having near-infrared (NIR) emission wavelengths have the ability to penetrate tissue deeper than other emission wavelengths, providing enormous potential for non-invasive imaging applications. However, advancement of optical imaging (particularly NIR imaging) is hindered by the limitation of narrow Stokes shift of most infrared dyes currently available in the market. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel NIR dye (4-Sulfonir) for multichannel imaging that enables in vivo imaging of multiple targets due to its large Stokes shift. 4-Sulfonir with its unique large Stokes shift (~150 nm) and wide excitation spectrum could be used in parallel with other NIR dyes for imaging two molecular events simultaneously in one target.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

New Drug for Blood Clot: FXII Inhibitors to Treat Thrombosis

Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel, which may cause reduced blood flow to a tissue, or even tissue death. Thrombosis, inflammation, and infections are responsible for >70% of all human mortality. Thrombosis is also the major factor for heart disease and stroke. 500,000 die from thrombosis every year in Europe. Inhibitory treatment of these conditions may also improve the outcomes of several non-fatal diseases. Researchers from Vanderbilt University and Oregon Health & Science University have jointly discovered new monoclonal antibodies that potently inhibit the blood coagulation protein factor XII (FXII), a critical player in the pathway, and anticoagulate blood. This invention provides foundation for commercial development of anti-thrombotic drugs based on new molecular entities.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430
Therapeutics