Browse Technologies

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MemoryMonitor: A real-time neuroscientific learning monitor that knows whether you will later remember something you see

We all wish that we could know if we were going to later remember something, the moment that new information enters our brain. For example, if we could predict whether our children would later remember a vocabulary word, then we could have them spend more time on the words they will not remember. A group of neuroscientists at Vanderbilt University has developed a way of measuring and analyzing brain activity that achieves this goal of predicting later memory as we study and view new information. The procedure involves measuring brainwaves from just two electrodes on the head as people view pictures, words, or virtually any kind of information that a person hopes to remember later.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

3DMD SmartCasting System

Vanderbilt University researchers have  developed a new approach to corrective serial casting, particularly for the treatment of clubfoot, that produces a custom fit to patient anatomy and therapeutic need.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790
Medical Imaging

COX2 Probes for Multimodal Imaging

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a novel chemical design and synthesis process for azulene-based COX2 contrast agents which can be used for molecular imaging, via a variety of imaging techniques. These COX2 probes can be utilized for numerous applications, including imaging cancers and inflammation caused by arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The process for developing these COX2 contrast agents has been significantly improved through a convergent synthesis process which reduces the required steps to establish the COX2 precursors.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Imaging

Sterile blood culture collection kit for reducing blood culture contamination at healthcare institutions

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a sterile kit to collect blood cultures that results in substantially fewer contaminated cultures compared to the current standard of care for collecting culture specimens.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Guide Wire Torque Device for Interventional Medical Procedures

Vanderbilt University researchers have created a torque device that allows surgeons to apply better torque and grip to guide wires used in interventional medical procedures.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Michael Nichols
Medical Devices

NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) in Water

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a method to perform the Parahydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) based method of Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) in aqueous media. This allows the resulting hyperpolarized molecules to be used for in vivo applications.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Organ-on-a-Chip System

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a group of microfluidic organ-on-chip devices that include perfusion controllers, microclinical analyzers, microformulators, and integrated microfluidic measurement chips. Together, these devices can measure and control multiple organ-on-chip systems in order to model the multi-organ physiology of humans.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Microfluidics

New antibiotics against new targets in multi-drug resistant microorganisms

New everninomicin antibiotics including a potent bifunctional antibiotic natural product targeting two different and distant ribosomal sites are under development and can be readily produced using synthetic biology. Developing resistance to this bidentate antibiotic should be very difficult for pathogenic microorganisms.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Therapeutics
Infectious Disease

New Molecules Clear Chronic Infections by Disrupting Bacterial Energy Production Pathways

New compounds developed at Vanderbilt demonstrate a unique mechanism of broad spectrum activity to stymy antibacterial resistance. The compounds are particularly useful in chronic infections where long term antibiotic therapy fails, because it specifically kills "small colony variants" -- the bacteria that have developed resistance mechanisms. These compounds show promise in treating Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), and in overcoming difficult-to-treat infections in bone in cystic fibrosis patients. These compounds could be combined with new (and old) antimicrobial drugs to outwit resistant bacterial infections.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Therapeutics

Targeting microRNAs as a Treatment for Vascular Disease

Vanderbilt researchers have identified a highly expressed microRNA crucial in angiotensin induced hypertension; and developed a therapeutic strategy that focuses on local or systemic administration of antisense microRNA to inhibit microRNA expression as treatment for vascular diseases. Promising data in animal models reveals that the inhibition of such microRNA not only prevents fibrosis but also reverses previously established aortic stiffening.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907