Browse Technologies

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Inexpensive Disposable Hydro-Jet Capsule Robot for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low-Income Countries

Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While screening programs have had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality, the majority of cases occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Typically, screening for gastric and esophageal cancer is performed using a flexible endoscope; however, endoscopy resources for these settings are traditionally limited. With the development of an inexpensive, disposable system by Vanderbilt researchers, gastroscopy and colonoscopy can be facilitated in areas hampered by a lack of access to the appropriate means.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Lanthanide Oxide Nanoparticle Film Deposition Process

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a method for forming a film of lanthanide oxide nanoparticles using electrophoretic deposition. This technique is straightforward to set up and provides thickness control at high deposition rates, enabling site selective particle assembly for any size and shape.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Laser Range Scanning for Cortical Surface Registration & Deformation Tracking

This technology aligns a patient in an image-guided surgery system (registration) without the use of fiducial markers on the cranium exterior. The system utilizes laser range scanning technology, the features on the cortical surface and the corresponding natural features derived from the patient's preoperative MR-data. In addition, the technology is amenable to measuring deformation (brain shift) in order to compensate for intra-operative registration error.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Imaging

Latent Image-Derived Features for Prognostic Modeling

Researchers at Vanderbilt have developed a system to estimate prognostic metrics such as the length of a hospital stay, recovery status at discharge, and overall health at discharge, using only baseline imaging and clinical information gathered early in the hospital admission process. This system can assist with medical group operations and planning, it can help to educate families and patients regarding prognosis, and can be used to automatically stage patients for clinical trials.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Local Magnetic Actuation for Obese And Pediatric Patients

Researchers in Vanderbilt University's STORM Lab have developed a novel actuation system that uses magnetic coupling to transmit mechanical power across a physical barrier. This technology is particularly suited for use in minimally invasive surgical procedures for manipulating surgical instruments across tissue barriers.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Robotics
Gastrointestinal

Method for Non-Invasive Complete Vascular Occlusion Using MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Surgery

Researchers have developed a non-invasive method for creating vascular occlusions at specific locations within a vessel using magnetic resonance guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS). The speed and efficacy of this approach is better than traditional vascular occlusion methods, and the method can be further enhanced through the use of phase shift nano-droplets. The approach is even applicable to large vessels that can be extremely challenging to ablate due to the heat sink effect. Ultimately, the ability to occlude selected vasculature could aid in the treatment of vascular malformations, hemorrhage control, and tumor devascularization.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Devices

Molecular Image Fusion: Cross-Modality Modeling and Prediction Software for Molecular Imaging

A research team at Vanderbilt University Mass Spectrometry Research Center has developed the Molecular Image Fusion software system, that by fusing spatial correspondence between histology and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) measurements and cross-modality modeling, can predict ion distributions in tissue at spatial resolutions that exceed their acquisition resolution. The prediction resolution can even exceed the highest spatial resolution at which IMS can be physically measured. This software has been successfully tested on different IMS datasets and can be extended to other imaging modalities like MRI, PET, CT, profilometry, ion mobility spectroscopy, and different forms of microscopy.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

Nanostructured Molybdenum (IV) Disulfide (MoS2) Electrodes for use in Solar Cells

Quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) are a widely studied system for harvesting light and converting it to electrical energy. Quantum dots (QDs) are an attractive photoabsorber because they have large absorption coefficients and their energy of absorption in the visible region can be tuned based on their size. Molybdenum (IV) disulfide (MoS2) is a naturally occurring semiconductor found in nature as the mineral molybdenite that can be synthesized from inexpensive, earth-abundant materials for use in solar cells.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Natural product for seizure relief and long term disease modification in Dravet Syndrome

Dravet syndrome is a lifelong form of epilepsy beginning in early childhood. Children with Dravet syndrome suffer aggressive seizures, impaired cognition, and an increased risk of premature death. Dravet syndrome does not respond to conventional anti-epileptic drugs, and current treatment regimens fail to fully elevate seizures. No disease modifying treatments exist. Researchers at Vanderbilt University have discovered a novel application of a known natural product in treating Dravet syndrome. This natural product could be beneficial to children suffering from Dravet syndrome in both reducing seizures and treating the underlying disease cause.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852

Inventors

Jingqiong Kang
Therapeutics
Neuroscience/Neurology

Non-Invasive Bacterial Identification for Acute Otitis Media using Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an optical-based method for real-time characterization of middle ear fluid in order to diagnose acute otitis media, also knows as a middle ear infection. The present technique allows for quick detection and identification of bacteria and can also be applied to other biological fluids in vivo.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503