Browse Technologies

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Advanced Ultrasound Imaging for Kidney Stone Detection

The standard for kidney stone detection is through the use of computed tomography (CT). However, CT is expensive and delivers harmful ionizing radiation into the body. Ultrasound would be the ideal way to detect kidney stones except that it performs poorly in detecting and accurately sizing stones. Vanderbilt researchers inventors have developed a technique that is able to separate hard, mineralized material (i.e kidney stones) from soft tissue in a way that is both cheaper and safer than CT and performs better than conventional ultrasound imaging.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Assessment of Right Ventricular Function Using Contrast Echocardiography

Vanderbilt Medical Center researchers have developed a non-invasive and reproducible method of assessing right-ventricular function using contrast-echocardiography. The right-ventricular transit time (RVTT) measures the time needed for echocardiographic contrast to travel from the RV to the bifurcation of the main pulmonary artery. Coupled with the pulmonary transit time (PTT), the time needed for contrast to traverse the entire pulmonary circulation, RVTT is part of a family of diagnostic parameters that can report on RV-specific performance as well as the RV's function relative to that of the pulmonary circuit as a whole.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Automated Inflatable Binder to Counter the Effects of Orthostatic Hypotension

Vanderbilt scientists have developed an automated inflatable abdominal binder that can detect when a patient moves from a prone or sitting positon to a standing position and automatically apply a sustained servo-controlled compression pressure in order to counter the effects of OH. The binder is as effective as conventional drug therapy in controlling OH, without subjecting patients to potentially harmful side effects and interactions with other medications.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Medical Devices
Cardiovascular

Brain Shift Compensation Using Computer Models

The Vanderbilt University Biomedical Modeling Laboratory, led by Dr. Michael Miga, has developed a method to overcome intra-operative brain shifts experienced during neurosurgery using computer modeling that augments standard image-guided surgery technology. Current standard of care methods of image-guided surgery have limitations on accuracy, which is overcome by this new method.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Dual Interlocked Logic (DIL) Circuit

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel combinatorial logic circuit that prevents the propagation of signal glitches such as those caused by radiation-induced transients. The interlocked-feedback circuit accomplishes this without the loss of any speed. The circuit is designed for robustness in both combinatorial and sequential logic applications.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Electrospun Filter Media:Effective Removal of Salt Aerosols

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a specialized filter media to remove salt aerosols from the air. The filter media is able to be merged with other filter components to create a single filter for separating multiple types of airborne particles. Using the developed filter media provides more versatility and functionality to the manufacturing of filters for air and molecular purification products.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Ferroelectric Nanofluids for Piezoelectric and Electro-Optic Uses

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have developed a new method of producing microscale and nanoscale ferroelectric fluids. These particles are useful in a variety of piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and electrooptic devices such as thin-film capacitors, electronic transducers, actuators, high-k dielectrics, pyroelectric sensors, and optical memories.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

High Performance Battery Electrodes Using Electrospun Nanofibers

A Vanderbilt researcher has developed a new battery electrode that uses particle/polymer electrospun nanofiber mats to increase energy density and decrease the required charge time for the battery. The technique can be used with any high energy density metal-ion batteries such as lithium-ion or sodium-ion.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Inventors

Peter Pintauro
Energy

Hyper-SHIELDED - Preserving Parahydrogen Spin Order by Efficient Transfer of Nuclear Singlet

Hyperpolarization of nuclear spin ensembles has increased NMR sensitivity to a level that is now enabling detection of metabolism in biological tissue on a time-scale of seconds. The present invention is a pulse sequence that efficiently transforms parahydrogen spin order into heteronuclear magnetization. This was achieved via a single streamlined sequence without recursive application, by finding sequential analytic solutions to the density matrix evolution for each of four independent intervals that collectively flank two proton inversions and one heteronuclear excitation. The name hyper-SHIELDED (Singlet to Heteronuclei by Interative Evolution Locks Dramatic Enhancement for Delivery) reflects the sequence's protective effect on PHIP hyperpolarization.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Image-Guided Radio Frequency Ablation

The Biomedical Modeling Laboratory at Vanderbilt University has produced a method and apparatus for use during the collection and processing of physical space data during image-guided surgery. This technology provides a complete system for performing tissue ablations that includes a spatial probe, an ablation tool, and a computer processor. Using this technology, the surgeon is able to view the location of the ablation tool in the patient's medical images as well as the ablation zone of the instrument and the particular portion of the tissue to be ablated.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Devices