Browse Technologies

Displaying 11 - 20 of 262


Animal Health: Control of Insect Populations via Wolbachia or Bacteriophage Tools

The insect microbiome is a rich resource that can explored to control insect reproduction and insect populations at large. Vanderbilt University has a collection of technologies available for such purposes, including bacteriophage therapies, Wolbachia genomic editing techniques and tools, and transgenic insect approaches.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Point of Care Rheological Assay for Sickle Cell Disease

Vanderbilt researchers have created a novel technology for the diagnosis and monitoring of disease states using the rheological properties of a blood sample with a lateral flow membrane.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Portfolio of Image-Guidance and Organ Localization Technologies from the Lab of Professor Michael Miga

The focus of Dr. Miga's laboratory is on the development of new paradigms in detection, diagnosis, characterization, and treatment of disease through the integration of computational models into research and clinical practice.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Synthetic Beam Chopper

A new system of signal modulation and lock-in amplification has been developed at Vanderbilt University. The invention serves as a low cost alternative to current mechanical beam choppers and lock-in amplifiers, with lower limits of detection, decreased need for mechanical precision, and improved accuracy.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Jesse Shaver
Energy

Flexure Wrist for Surgical Devices

Vanderbilt researchers have designed a flexible wrist for use with manual or robotic surgical systems.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Continuum Robots with Equilibrium Modulation (CREM)

The A.R.M.A. Laboratory of Vanderbilt University has developed a novel continuum robot design enabling multi-scale motion at the macro and micro scale. The unique design allows miniaturization with minimal added cost thereby potentially giving rise to a new generation of surgical robots capable of both macro-motion for surgical intervention and micro-scale motion for cellular-level imaging or intervention. Micro-motion is achieved through a unique method for altering the equilibrium pose of the robot via material re-distribution throughout the length of the robot. This process ushers in a new class of surgical robotics termed continuum robots with equilibrium modulation (CREM).


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices

Portfolio of Continuum Robotic Systems, Algorithms, and Software Technologies from the Robotics Lab of Professor Nabil Simaan

Professor Simaan and his lab have years of experiencing working collaboratively with commercial entities of various sizes. His research is focused on advanced robotics, mechanism design, control, and telemanipulation for medical applications. His projects have led the way in advancing several robotics technologies for medical applications including high dexterity, snake-like robots for surgery, steerable electrode arrays for cochlear implant surgery, robotics for single port access surgery, and natural orifice surgery.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices
Genitourinary

Smart Battery Controller with Fault Tolerance

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a smart controller that intelligently reconfigures a battery bank to both extend the overall discharge time and provide fault tolerance.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Polar Liquid Crystals with High Dielectric Anisotropy

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a new class of liquid crystals with high dielectric anisotropy. A new class of liquid crystals containing boron in their structure has been developed with high dielectric anisotropy, which results in low threshold voltages.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

New Clostridium Difficile Recombinant Toxin for Safe Vaccine Development

A structural biology approach has identified a conserved region common to multiple Clostridium toxins. Specific mutations of the protein sequence in this region prevent the toxins from entering into intestinal cells, thereby preventing widespread tissue damage. These recombinant Clostridium toxins may be used to create a multivalent vaccine to protect against multiple species of Clostridium. Furthermore, the recombinant toxin may be used as a safer alternative to the native toxins in vaccine manufacturing. This discovery stems from a collaboration between the laboratories of Dr. Borden Lacy of Vanderbilt University and Dr. Roman Melnyk of the Hospital for Sick Children.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907