Browse Technologies

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Trackerless Image-Guidance Using a Surgical Microscope

Researchers at Vanderbilt have developed a new image-guided, trackerless surgical microscope system to be used in soft tissue surgeries. The current method is to use a surgical microscope along with an image-guided system. This new design eliminates the need for a separate image-guidance system; the entire guidance environment can be realized within the microscope environment.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Inventors

Michael Miga

New Insect Repellants Disrupt Olfactory Cues: A Strategy for Pest Protection

A multinational research team, led by Dr. L. J. Zwiebel of Vanderbilt University, has identified new compounds with potential as insect repellents. These compounds work by capitalizing on knowledge of how insect odorant receptors detect and respond to scents. Medicinal chemistry efforts have yielded a number of novel compounds that could short-circuit the insect olfactory system, essentially by over-stimulation, to effectively mask attractive odors. These compounds could be used to repel nuisance and disease-carrying insects away from humans and animals, as well as repel agricultural pests from crops or food storage facilities. Vanderbilt University is seeking commercial partners to develop the technology for agricultural uses.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Continuum Robots with Equilibrium Modulation (CREM)

The A.R.M.A. Laboratory of Vanderbilt University has developed a novel continuum robot design enabling multi-scale motion at the macro and micro scale. The unique design allows miniaturization with minimal added cost thereby potentially giving rise to a new generation of surgical robots capable of both macro-motion for surgical intervention and micro-scale motion for cellular-level imaging or intervention. Micro-motion is achieved through a unique method for altering the equilibrium pose of the robot via material re-distribution throughout the length of the robot. This process ushers in a new class of surgical robotics termed continuum robots with equilibrium modulation (CREM).


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices

Portfolio of Continuum Robotic Systems, Algorithms, and Software Technologies from the Robotics Lab of Professor Nabil Simaan

Professor Simaan and his lab have years of experiencing working collaboratively with commercial entities of various sizes. His research is focused on advanced robotics, mechanism design, control, and telemanipulation for medical applications. His projects have led the way in advancing several robotics technologies for medical applications including high dexterity, snake-like robots for surgery, steerable electrode arrays for cochlear implant surgery, robotics for single port access surgery, and natural orifice surgery.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices
Genitourinary

Organ-on-a-Chip System

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a group of microfluidic organ-on-chip devices that include perfusion controllers, microclinical analyzers, microformulators, and integrated microfluidic measurement chips. Together, these devices can measure and control multiple organ-on-chip systems in order to model the multi-organ physiology of humans.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Microfluidics

New antibiotics against new targets in multi-drug resistant microorganisms

New everninomicin antibiotics including a potent bifunctional antibiotic natural product targeting two different and distant ribosomal sites are under development and can be readily produced using synthetic biology. Developing resistance to this bidentate antibiotic should be very difficult for pathogenic microorganisms.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Therapeutics
Infectious Disease

Long-Lasting and Self-Sustaining Cell Therapy System

Researchers at Vanderbilt have created a novel drug delivery system using two distinct T-cell populations that interact to promote engraftment and persistence in pre-clinical models, increasing the efficacy of T-cell therapies. Furthermore, "booster" treatments can be administered months after the first dose to produce an expansion of antigen specific T cells. These advantages result in longer-term therapeutic efficacy and could reduce the number of treatments required. This system also represents a viable self-renewing platform for the delivery of biologic drugs in patients who would otherwise require frequent administration.


Licensing Contact

Clarissa Muere

615.343.2430

I-Wire: A Biotension Measurement Device for Tissue Engineering and Pharmacology

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an integrated system ("I-Wire") for the growth of miniature, engineered 3D cardiac or other muscle or connective tissues and their active and passive mechanical characterization. The system utilizes an inverted microscope to measure the strain when the tissue constructs are laterally displaced using a calibrated flexible cantilevered probe.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Multisubstrate Inhibitors of Histone Acetylation Increase the Cytotoxicity of Chemotherapeutic Agents

Inhibitors of histone acetylation may constitute a novel class of potent therapy sensitizers applicable to a broad range of conventional cancer treatments.


Licensing Contact

Mike Villalobos

615.322.6751
Therapeutics
Oncology

PosiSeat(TM): Assured Seating of Threaded Surgical Components

Vanderbilt presents an intraoperative device for taking the guesswork out of whether or not a threaded component is securely affixed to bone. This device is an anchor driver that automatically releases upon proper seating of the anchor on the bone of interest.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505