Browse Technologies

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Heterogeneous catalysis of NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange(SABRE)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed heterogeneous catalysis and catalyst for the NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) hyperpolarization process. Coupled with the researchers' development of a method to perform SABRE in aqueous solutions, this discovery could allow fully biocompatible SABRE hyperpolarization processes in water with catalyst recycling. This would allow the production of pure aqueous contrast agents requiring only parahydrogen as a consumable.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Polar Liquid Crystals with High Dielectric Anisotropy

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a new class of liquid crystals with high dielectric anisotropy. A new class of liquid crystals containing boron in their structure has been developed with high dielectric anisotropy, which results in low threshold voltages.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Precision Pneumatic Robot for MRI-Guided Neurosurgery

At Vanderbilt University, a robotic steering mechanism for MRI-guided neurosurgical ablation has been developed. The small robot has submilimeter precision and is fully MRI compatible. It aims to replace current surgical practices with minimally invasive procedures in order to enhance the treatment of cancer and numerous neurological disorders such as epilepsy.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Medical Devices

PosiSeat(TM): Assured Seating of Threaded Surgical Components

Vanderbilt presents an intraoperative device for taking the guesswork out of whether or not a threaded component is securely affixed to bone. This device is an anchor driver that automatically releases upon proper seating of the anchor on the bone of interest.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505

mGlu4 PAMs as selective small molecule therapeutics totreat Parkinson's disease


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852

Metabolic Biomarkers for Detecting Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease

Vanderbilt researchers have identified five key metabolites that, in combination with routine clinical tests, can serve as viable biomarkers for early-stage CKD. This technology offers a robust, minimally invasive, and accurate diagnostic tool that can be deployed in a variety of healthcare settings to improve care and slow or prevent progression to end-stage renal disease.


Licensing Contact

Tom Utley

615.343.3852

Inventors

Yan Guo, Ying-Yong Zhao
Diagnostics

Inexpensive Disposable Hydro-Jet Capsule Robot for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low-Income Countries

Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While screening programs have had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality, the majority of cases occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Typically, screening for gastric and esophageal cancer is performed using a flexible endoscope; however, endoscopy resources for these settings are traditionally limited. With the development of an inexpensive, disposable system by Vanderbilt researchers, gastroscopy and colonoscopy can be facilitated in areas hampered by a lack of access to the appropriate means.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Non-Invasive Bacterial Identification for Acute Otitis Media using Raman Spectroscopy

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an optical-based method for real-time characterization of middle ear fluid in order to diagnose acute otitis media, also knows as a middle ear infection. The present technique allows for quick detection and identification of bacteria and can also be applied to other biological fluids in vivo.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

"Anode-Free" Sodium Metal Battery

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a new "anode-free" battery architecture for sodium-ion batteries that provide energy densities in excess of 400Wh/kg, which is greater than the maximum theoretical energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Inventors

Adam Cohn, Cary Pint
Energy

Cell-Permeable Socs Proteins That Inhibit Cytokine-Induced Signaling

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a unique polypeptide using cell-penetrating SOCS polypeptides or SOCS sequences designed to inhibits cytokine signaling and thus prevent or treat inflammation or an inflammatory related disease such as diabetes. This strategy has been validated in NOD mice models for either induced or naturally occurring diabetes and have been efficacious.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430
Therapeutics