Browse Technologies

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Sterile blood culture collection kit for reducing blood culture contamination at healthcare institutions

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a sterile kit to collect blood cultures that results in substantially fewer contaminated cultures compared to the current standard of care for collecting culture specimens.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Low-cost, Normally Closed Microfluidic Valve

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a normally closed valve that is able to provide selective movement of small fluid quantities in a microfluidic device. The present microfluidic valve can be actuated using a simple rotating drivehead and mechanical support, greatly simplifying the valve design.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Guide Wire Torque Device for Interventional Medical Procedures

Vanderbilt University researchers have created a torque device that allows surgeons to apply better torque and grip to guide wires used in interventional medical procedures.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Michael Nichols
Medical Devices

NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) in Water

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a method to perform the Parahydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) based method of Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) in aqueous media. This allows the resulting hyperpolarized molecules to be used for in vivo applications.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Organ-on-a-Chip System

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a group of microfluidic organ-on-chip devices that include perfusion controllers, microclinical analyzers, microformulators, and integrated microfluidic measurement chips. Together, these devices can measure and control multiple organ-on-chip systems in order to model the multi-organ physiology of humans.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Microfluidics

New antibiotics against new targets in multi-drug resistant microorganisms

New everninomicin antibiotics including a potent bifunctional antibiotic natural product targeting two different and distant ribosomal sites are under development and can be readily produced using synthetic biology. Developing resistance to this bidentate antibiotic should be very difficult for pathogenic microorganisms.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Therapeutics
Infectious Disease

IntelliCane: Instrumented cane for diagnosis and evaluation of gait behavior in individuals with mobility issues.

This device is designed to assist physical therapists in collection of objective data during gait analysis, to facilitate appropriate assistive gait device prescription, to provide patients and therapists feedback during gait training, and to reduce wrist and shoulder injuries with cane usage.Currently gait characteristics are "measured" in a clinic-based atmosphere. This has two limitations: (i) subjective allocation of "measures" of gait characteristics and (ii) limited data based on trials in the clinic ONLY. What this technology is designed to do is achieve freedom from both of these limitations. The measurements are objective and numerical values (force etc.) and the clinic could provide the cane to the user for obtaining a much more extensive data set including use during normal life activities at home etc.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices

New Molecules Clear Chronic Infections by Disrupting Bacterial Energy Production Pathways

New compounds developed at Vanderbilt demonstrate a unique mechanism of broad spectrum activity to stymy antibacterial resistance. The compounds are particularly useful in chronic infections where long term antibiotic therapy fails, because it specifically kills "small colony variants" -- the bacteria that have developed resistance mechanisms. These compounds show promise in treating Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), Bacillus anthracis (anthrax), and in overcoming difficult-to-treat infections in bone in cystic fibrosis patients. These compounds could be combined with new (and old) antimicrobial drugs to outwit resistant bacterial infections.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Therapeutics

LUMASIL: A Low-Level Light Therapy Device for Treating Diabetic Foot Ulcers

LumaSiL is a low-level light therapy (LLLT) producing device which aims to accelerate wound healing and reduce the incidence of infection in diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). There is no treatment option using this technology that actively encourages diabetic foot ulcer healing, complements current procedures, and maintains patient compliance. Complications like infection often require the need for surgical intervention such as lower-extremity amputation. Previous studies have shown that exposing wounds to dose-specific levels of light can reduce wound size and promote healing. Incorporated into a standard of care, the total-contact cast, this device transfers LED light from a power source to the wound site in order to introduce an active healing component for diabetic foot ulcers.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Model-based Compression Correction Framework for Ultrasound

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a system that corrects for compressional effects in ultrasound data during soft tissue imaging. The system uses tracking and digitization information to detect the pose of the ultrasound probe during imaging, and then couples this information with a biomechanical model of the tissue to correct compressional effects during intraoperative imaging.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503