Browse Technologies

Displaying 31 - 40 of 253


New Insect Repellants Disrupt Olfactory Cues: A Strategy for Pest Protection

A multinational research team, led by Dr. L. J. Zwiebel of Vanderbilt University, has identified new compounds with potential as insect repellents. These compounds work by capitalizing on knowledge of how insect odorant receptors detect and respond to scents. Medicinal chemistry efforts have yielded a number of novel compounds that could short-circuit the insect olfactory system, essentially by over-stimulation, to effectively mask attractive odors. These compounds could be used to repel nuisance and disease-carrying insects away from humans and animals, as well as repel agricultural pests from crops or food storage facilities. Vanderbilt University is seeking commercial partners to develop the technology for agricultural uses.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430

Incorporating Quantum Dots into Additive Manufacturing Processes

Recent studies have shown the benefits that nanocomposite materials have over unmodified materials in regard to mechanical, chemical, and optical properties. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a technique for the incorporation of quantum dots into polymers for use in additive manufacturing processes. The process has been used to create a nanocomposite material with unique absorbance, fluorescence, and ultraviolet (UV) light excitation properties.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

3DMD SmartCasting System

Vanderbilt University researchers have  developed a new approach to corrective serial casting, particularly for the treatment of clubfoot, that produces a custom fit to patient anatomy and therapeutic need.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790
Medical Imaging

Arthropod Pest Reproductive Manipulation by Wolbachia Genes

This technology is a transgenic method of controlling arthropod pest and disease vectors such as mosquito populations, by manipulating reproductive viability. Some strains of the intracellular Wolbachia bacterium found naturally in some arthropods can been used to control pest populations by altering reproductive success. The presence of this bacterium in males can lead to the death of offspring, when these males mate with uninfected females. Two of the genes in the Wolbachia bacterium which induce this loss of offspring viability have been identified. Our data reveals that these genes can be directly expressed in arthropods to have a similar effect in the absence of the bacterium. This technology can be used to transgenically target and reduce arthropod populations.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

COX2 Probes for Multimodal Imaging

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a novel chemical design and synthesis process for azulene-based COX2 contrast agents which can be used for molecular imaging, via a variety of imaging techniques. These COX2 probes can be utilized for numerous applications, including imaging cancers and inflammation caused by arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The process for developing these COX2 contrast agents has been significantly improved through a convergent synthesis process which reduces the required steps to establish the COX2 precursors.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Imaging

Sterile blood culture collection kit for reducing blood culture contamination at healthcare institutions

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a sterile kit to collect blood cultures that results in substantially fewer contaminated cultures compared to the current standard of care for collecting culture specimens.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Guide Wire Torque Device for Interventional Medical Procedures

Vanderbilt University researchers have created a torque device that allows surgeons to apply better torque and grip to guide wires used in interventional medical procedures.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Michael Nichols
Medical Devices

NMR Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) in Water

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a method to perform the Parahydrogen Induced Polarization (PHIP) based method of Signal Amplification by Reversible Exchange (SABRE) in aqueous media. This allows the resulting hyperpolarized molecules to be used for in vivo applications.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Organ-on-a-Chip System

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a group of microfluidic organ-on-chip devices that include perfusion controllers, microclinical analyzers, microformulators, and integrated microfluidic measurement chips. Together, these devices can measure and control multiple organ-on-chip systems in order to model the multi-organ physiology of humans.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Microfluidics

New antibiotics against new targets in multi-drug resistant microorganisms

New everninomicin antibiotics including a potent bifunctional antibiotic natural product targeting two different and distant ribosomal sites are under development and can be readily produced using synthetic biology. Developing resistance to this bidentate antibiotic should be very difficult for pathogenic microorganisms.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Therapeutics
Infectious Disease