Browse Technologies

Displaying 31 - 40 of 253


Dexterous Robotic Wrist and Gripper for Extreme Precision Micro-surgical Maneuvers in Confined Spaces

This invention presents a robotic wrist and gripper that operate with three independent degrees of freedom (yaw, pitch and roll) for increased dexterity in minimally invasive surgical procedures. This is the smallest robotic wrist of its kind, and due to its size and unparalleled dexterity, this wrist enables complex surgical maneuvers for minimally invasive procedures in highly confined spaces. Examples of surgical areas benefiting from use of this wrist include natural orifice surgery, single port access surgery, and minimally invasive surgery. In particular, the proposed wrist allows for very high precision roll about the longitudinal axis of the gripper while overcoming problems of run-out motion typically encountered in existing wrists. Thus this wrist is particularly suitable for extreme precision maneuvers for micro-surgery in confined spaces.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Synthetic Beam Chopper

A new system of signal modulation and lock-in amplification has been developed at Vanderbilt University. The invention serves as a low cost alternative to current mechanical beam choppers and lock-in amplifiers, with lower limits of detection, decreased need for mechanical precision, and improved accuracy.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Inventors

Jesse Shaver
Energy

Systems-Biology Infrastructure to Identify Drug Repurposing Opportunities as Antiviral & Anticancer Therapeutics

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an in-silico screening method to reveal new indications for existing drugs with known protein targets using a novel infrastructure. The infrastructure integrates multiple factors across system-biology models to create a drug discovery pipeline.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430

MemoryMonitor: A real-time neuroscientific learning monitor that knows whether you will later remember something you see

We all wish that we could know if we were going to later remember something, the moment that new information enters our brain. For example, if we could predict whether our children would later remember a vocabulary word, then we could have them spend more time on the words they will not remember. A group of neuroscientists at Vanderbilt University has developed a way of measuring and analyzing brain activity that achieves this goal of predicting later memory as we study and view new information. The procedure involves measuring brainwaves from just two electrodes on the head as people view pictures, words, or virtually any kind of information that a person hopes to remember later.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

New Insect Repellants Disrupt Olfactory Cues: A Strategy for Pest Protection

A multinational research team, led by Dr. L. J. Zwiebel of Vanderbilt University, has identified new compounds with potential as insect repellents. These compounds work by capitalizing on knowledge of how insect odorant receptors detect and respond to scents. Medicinal chemistry efforts have yielded a number of novel compounds that could short-circuit the insect olfactory system, essentially by over-stimulation, to effectively mask attractive odors. These compounds could be used to repel nuisance and disease-carrying insects away from humans and animals, as well as repel agricultural pests from crops or food storage facilities. Vanderbilt University is seeking commercial partners to develop the technology for agricultural uses.


Licensing Contact

Janis Elsner

615.343.2430

3DMD SmartCasting System

Vanderbilt University researchers have  developed a new approach to corrective serial casting, particularly for the treatment of clubfoot, that produces a custom fit to patient anatomy and therapeutic need.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790
Medical Imaging

Arthropod Pest Reproductive Manipulation by Wolbachia Genes

This technology is a transgenic method of controlling arthropod pest and disease vectors such as mosquito populations, by manipulating reproductive viability. Some strains of the intracellular Wolbachia bacterium found naturally in some arthropods can been used to control pest populations by altering reproductive success. The presence of this bacterium in males can lead to the death of offspring, when these males mate with uninfected females. Two of the genes in the Wolbachia bacterium which induce this loss of offspring viability have been identified. Our data reveals that these genes can be directly expressed in arthropods to have a similar effect in the absence of the bacterium. This technology can be used to transgenically target and reduce arthropod populations.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

COX2 Probes for Multimodal Imaging

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a novel chemical design and synthesis process for azulene-based COX2 contrast agents which can be used for molecular imaging, via a variety of imaging techniques. These COX2 probes can be utilized for numerous applications, including imaging cancers and inflammation caused by arthritis and cardiovascular diseases. The process for developing these COX2 contrast agents has been significantly improved through a convergent synthesis process which reduces the required steps to establish the COX2 precursors.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Imaging

Sterile blood culture collection kit for reducing blood culture contamination at healthcare institutions

Scientists at Vanderbilt have developed a sterile kit to collect blood cultures that results in substantially fewer contaminated cultures compared to the current standard of care for collecting culture specimens.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Guide Wire Torque Device for Interventional Medical Procedures

Vanderbilt University researchers have created a torque device that allows surgeons to apply better torque and grip to guide wires used in interventional medical procedures.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Inventors

Michael Nichols
Medical Devices