Browse Technologies

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Adaptive PCR: A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions

A PCR control system to overcome challenging conditions. By directly monitoring the hybridization of fluorescently labelled L-DNA mimics of the template DNA strands and primers, it is possible to improve the efficiency of PCR in challenging conditions. This approach eliminates some of the sample preparation and trial and error that would otherwise be required for difficult sample types such as urine or other samples that contain high levels of salts.  In addition, this approach enables on-demand PCR in most any environment.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Research Reagent

Steerable Needles: A Better Turning Radius with Less Tissue Damage

A team of Vanderbilt engineers and surgeons have developed a new steerable needle that can make needle based biopsy and therapy delivery more accurate. A novel flexure-based tip design provides enhanced steerability while simultaneously minimizing tissue damage. The present device is useful for almost any needle-based procedure including biopsy, thermal ablation, brachytherapy, and drug delivery.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Non-Invasive Skin Cancer Detection using Raman Spectroscopy-OCT System (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt University researchers have designed a system for non-invasive discrimination between normal and cancerous skin lesions. The system combines the depth-resolving capabilities of OCT technique with Raman Spectroscopy's specificity of molecular chemistry. By linking both imagining techniques into a single detector arm, the complexity, cost, and size of previously reported RS-OCT instruments have been significantly improved. The combined instrument is capable of acquiring data sets that allow for more thorough assessment of a sample than existing optical techniques.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Systems and Methods for Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissues (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technique for contactless simulation of the central nervous system.  This involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system.  While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system. This technology has been protected by a portfolio of issued patents.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

MAESTRO: Non-Robotic Dexterous Laproscopic Instrument with a Wrist providing seven degrees of freedom

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a non-robotic dexterous laparoscopic manipulator with a wrist providing seven-degrees-of-freedom. The device has a novel user interface that intuitively maps motion of the surgeon's hands to the tool's "hands".


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503
Medical Devices

Smart Battery Controller with Fault Tolerance

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a smart controller that intelligently reconfigures a battery bank to both extend the overall discharge time and provide fault tolerance.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Polar Liquid Crystals with High Dielectric Anisotropy

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a new class of liquid crystals with high dielectric anisotropy. A new class of liquid crystals containing boron in their structure has been developed with high dielectric anisotropy, which results in low threshold voltages.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Long-Lasting and Self-Sustaining Cell Therapy System

Researchers at Vanderbilt have created a novel drug delivery system using two distinct T-cell populations that interact to promote engraftment and persistence in pre-clinical models, increasing the efficacy of T-cell therapies. Furthermore, "booster" treatments can be administered months after the first dose to produce an expansion of antigen specific T cells. These advantages result in longer-term therapeutic efficacy and could reduce the number of treatments required. This system also represents a viable self-renewing platform for the delivery of biologic drugs in patients who would otherwise require frequent administration.


Licensing Contact

Clarissa Muere

615.343.2430

Portfolio of Continuum Robotic Systems, Algorithms, and Software Technologies from the Robotics Lab of Professor Nabil Simaan

Professor Simaan and his lab have years of experiencing working collaboratively with commercial entities of various sizes. His research is focused on advanced robotics, mechanism design, control, and telemanipulation for medical applications. His projects have led the way in advancing several robotics technologies for medical applications including high dexterity, snake-like robots for surgery, steerable electrode arrays for cochlear implant surgery, robotics for single port access surgery, and natural orifice surgery.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548
Medical Devices
Genitourinary

Thiazole Based Inhibitors of Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) as Therapeutics

Compounds that inhibit LDH activity have potential for the development of anti-cancer therapeutics. Previously developed LDH inhibitors have significant drawbacks, including poor potency and/or poor bioavailability, limiting their utility as therapeutics. The present technology provides novel 1 H-PYRAZOL-1 -YL-THIAZOLE based LDH inhibitors with improved potency, selectivity, and/or bioavailability for the treatment of cancer.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907
Therapeutics