Browse Technologies

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Non-Invasive Skin Cancer Detection using Raman Spectroscopy-OCT System (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt University researchers have designed a system for non-invasive discrimination between normal and cancerous skin lesions. The system combines the depth-resolving capabilities of OCT technique with Raman Spectroscopy's specificity of molecular chemistry. By linking both imagining techniques into a single detector arm, the complexity, cost, and size of previously reported RS-OCT instruments have been significantly improved. The combined instrument is capable of acquiring data sets that allow for more thorough assessment of a sample than existing optical techniques.


Systems and Methods for Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissues (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technique for contactless simulation of the central nervous system.  This involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system.  While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system. This technology has been protected by a portfolio of issued patents.


Small Molecule Theraputics That Target the Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor 1 For The Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease

The Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD) has a mission to promote the translation of advances in basic science towards novel therapeutics. They have recruited faculty and staff with experience at over 10 different pharmaceutical companies to ensure a diverse set of approaches, techniques and philosophies to advancing compounds. Together they aim to de-risk drug discovery programs.


Novel PLD Inhibitors

Vanderbilt researchers have created the first isoform-selective phospholipase D (PLD) inhibitors. These highly potent inhibitors can significantly reduce PLD activity, creating a new class of anti-metastatic agents.


Prognostic Assay for High-altitude Pulmonary Hypertension in Cattle (Brisket Disease)

This genetic test identifies cattle at high risk of developing pulmonary hypertension at high altitudes (often called "brisket disease").  Brisket disease afflicts about 5% of cattle at high altitudes and the current predictive test for at-risk cattle is a measure of pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP).  This current PAP test has some major drawbacks.  First, it is an invasive test.  Secondly, it is not accurate at lower elevations -- so at-risk cattle cannot identified before incurring the cost of transport to high altitude.  There is no treatment for the disease except prompt removal of the animal to lower elevations.  This technology measures genetic variants that confer susceptibility to brisket disease, and could be developed into a diagnostic or a prognostic test for use prior to shipping cattle to higher elevations or in breeding operations.


New Clostridium Difficile Recombinant Toxin for Safe Vaccine Development

A structural biology approach has identified a conserved region common to multiple Clostridium toxins. Specific mutations of the protein sequence in this region prevent the toxins from entering into intestinal cells, thereby preventing widespread tissue damage. These recombinant Clostridium toxins may be used to create a multivalent vaccine to protect against multiple species of Clostridium. Furthermore, the recombinant toxin may be used as a safer alternative to the native toxins in vaccine manufacturing. This discovery stems from a collaboration between the laboratories of Dr. Borden Lacy of Vanderbilt University and Dr. Roman Melnyk of the Hospital for Sick Children.


Assessment of Right Ventricular Function Using Contrast Echocardiography

Vanderbilt Medical Center researchers have developed a non-invasive and reproducible method of assessing right-ventricular function using contrast-echocardiography. The right-ventricular transit time (RVTT) measures the time needed for echocardiographic contrast to travel from the RV to the bifurcation of the main pulmonary artery. Coupled with the pulmonary transit time (PTT), the time needed for contrast to traverse the entire pulmonary circulation, RVTT is part of a family of diagnostic parameters that can report on RV-specific performance as well as the RV's function relative to that of the pulmonary circuit as a whole.


Small Molecule mGlu5 NAMs For The Treatment of Depressive Disorders or Parkinson's Disease

The Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery (VCNDD) has a mission to promote the translation of advances in basic science towards novel therapeutics. They have recruited faculty and staff with experience at over 10 different pharmaceutical companies to ensure a diverse set of approaches, techniques and philosophies to advancing compounds. Together they aim to de-risk drug discovery programs.


Diagnostic to Predict Paternal Premature Birth Risk Factors: Therapy Can Reduce Risk

Premature birth is the leading cause of neonatal death worldwide, affecting 13% of US infants (500,000 babies/year). Of great concern, premature birth cannot currently be reliably predicted or prevented. Existing risk factors and interventions for premature birth focus solely on maternal factors, thereby overlooking paternal factors that influence an infant's development. Vanderbilt researchers have now identified a missing piece of the puzzle and are developing a diagnostic test to predict premature birth risks conferred to infants by their fathers. Of key importance, the test offers meaningful clinical guidance, as risk factors measured by the diagnostic can be modified before conception via supplementation.


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins
jody.hankins@vanderbilt.edu
615.322.5907
Diagnostics

Molecular Image Fusion: Cross-Modality Modeling and Prediction Software for Molecular Imaging

A research team at Vanderbilt University Mass Spectrometry Research Center has developed the Molecular Image Fusion software system, that by fusing spatial correspondence between histology and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) measurements and cross-modality modeling, can predict ion distributions in tissue at spatial resolutions that exceed their acquisition resolution. The prediction resolution can even exceed the highest spatial resolution at which IMS can be physically measured. This software has been successfully tested on different IMS datasets and can be extended to other imaging modalities like MRI, PET, CT, profilometry, ion mobility spectroscopy, and different forms of microscopy.