Browse Technologies

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3D Junction Bipolar Membranes: More Efficient and Reliable Electrodialysis

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a unique membrane material for more efficient and reliable eletrodialysis. By utilizing a 3D junction structure, the nanofiber bipolar membrane does not degrade or delaminate during high current passage unlike commercial 2D membranes that are currently available.

Early Damage and Imbalance Detection of Wind Turbine Rotors using Minimal Sensing

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a novel detection system that provides knowledge of early damage and imbalance for wind turbine rotors using minimal sensing.

Gratings on Porous Silicon Structures for Sensing Applications

In this technology diffraction-based sensors made from porous materials are used for the detection of small molecules. The porous nature of the diffraction gratings that gives rise to an extremely large active sensing area enables a very high level of sensitivity. Specificity is achieved by functionalizing the porous gratings with selective binding species.

Biohybrid, Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion Device Based on Photosystem I Deposited Silicon Electrodes

Summary: Aresearch team at Vanderbilt University have developed a biohybrid, photoelectrochemical energy conversion device with multilayer films of Photosystem I (PSI) deposited on silicon electrodes, which yielded an average photocurrent density of 875 µA/cm2; one of the highest reported photocurrent densities for a film of PSI deposited onto an electrode of any material.

Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.

Nanofiber Composite Membranes for Alkaline Fuel Cells

A new nanofiber composite membrane morphology and fabrication scheme has been developed at Vanderbilt University to be used for alkaline anion-exchange membrane fuel cells (AAEMFCs). This membrane has high hydroxyl ion conductivity, good mechanical properties, long term chemical stability and low water swelling. Additionally it is well suited for harsh conditions including high temperature and low humidity.

Composite Material for Tunable Memristance Behavior

This technology uses combinations of materials with different electronic properties of micro-or nanometerscale grain size to create a memristive device (twoterminal, variable resistance circuit element). Amidst growing interest in memristors, this technology is one of the first to use composite materials, which make the memristive qualities of the material tunable.

Ferroelectric Nanofluids for Piezoelectric and Electro-Optic Uses

Researchers at Vanderbilt University have developed a new method of producing microscale and nanoscale ferroelectric fluids. These particles are useful in a variety of piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and electrooptic devices such as thin-film capacitors, electronic transducers, actuators, high-k dielectrics, pyroelectric sensors, and optical memories.

High Inertance Liquid Piston Engine-Compressor

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a high inertance engine-compressor for use with pneumatically actuated devices, especially those with periods of inactivity between periods of pneumatic use. It utilizes a flexible diaphragm in combination with a liquid piston to achieve high inertance and other operational features such as high efficiency, low noise and low temperature operation.

Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

Diamond Triode Devices with a Diamond Microtip Emitter

This technology is a diamond triode for micro and power electronics. Diamond microtip field emitters are used in triode vacuum electronic devices, sensors and displays. Diamond triode devices having integral anode and grid structures are fabricated using a patented process. Ultra-sharp tips are formed on the emitters in the fabrication process in which diamond is deposited into mold cavities in a two-step deposition sequence. During deposition of the diamond, the carbon graphite content is carefully controlled to enhance emission performance. The tips or the emitters are treated by post-fabrication processes to further enhance performance.