Browse Technologies

Displaying 1 - 10 of 23


Bright White Light Nanocrystals for LEDs

A research team lead by Professor Sandra Rosenthal at Vanderbilt University has developed nanocrystals (~2 nm diameter) that emit white light with very high quantum efficiency. This technology would be a viable cost effective candidate for commercial solid-state lighting applications, such as Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs). These nanocrystals were originally discovered by the same group in 2005; a recent breakthrough in post-treatment results in improving fluorescent quantum yield up to ~ 45%.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Composite Material for Tunable Memristance Behavior

This technology uses combinations of materials with different electronic properties of micro-or nanometerscale grain size to create a memristive device (twoterminal, variable resistance circuit element). Amidst growing interest in memristors, this technology is one of the first to use composite materials, which make the memristive qualities of the material tunable.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Early Damage and Imbalance Detection of Wind Turbine Rotors using Minimal Sensing

Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a novel detection system that provides knowledge of early damage and imbalance for wind turbine rotors using minimal sensing.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Gratings on Porous Silicon Structures for Sensing Applications

In this technology diffraction-based sensors made from porous materials are used for the detection of small molecules. The porous nature of the diffraction gratings that gives rise to an extremely large active sensing area enables a very high level of sensitivity. Specificity is achieved by functionalizing the porous gratings with selective binding species.


Licensing Contact

Yiorgos Kostoulas

615.322.9790

High Inertance Liquid Piston Engine-Compressor

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a high inertance engine-compressor for use with pneumatically actuated devices, especially those with periods of inactivity between periods of pneumatic use. It utilizes a flexible diaphragm in combination with a liquid piston to achieve high inertance and other operational features such as high efficiency, low noise and low temperature operation.


Licensing Contact

Taylor Jordan

615.936.7505
Energy

High Performance Battery Electrodes Using Electrospun Nanofibers

A Vanderbilt researcher has developed a new battery electrode that uses particle/polymer electrospun nanofiber mats to increase energy density and decrease the required charge time for the battery. The technique can be used with any high energy density metal-ion batteries such as lithium-ion or sodium-ion.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Inventors

Peter Pintauro
Energy

Electrospun Filter Media:Effective Removal of Salt Aerosols

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a specialized filter media to remove salt aerosols from the air. The filter media is able to be merged with other filter components to create a single filter for separating multiple types of airborne particles. Using the developed filter media provides more versatility and functionality to the manufacturing of filters for air and molecular purification products.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

One-Step Hydrosilylation for Click Chemistry Compatible Surfaces

Vanderbilt inventors have developed a one-step hydrosilylation synthesis of azide surfaces for the preparation of click chemistry compatible substrates. In this process, an organic azide is formed in a single step on a hydrogen-terminated silicon support, yielding a surface that is ready to undergo click reactions as desired. Simple, efficient, and versatile, click chemistry is widely used and is particularly useful for biosensing applications. A click reaction can be utilized to attach a molecular or biological probe for point-of-care diagnostics and chemical screening.


Licensing Contact

Ashok Choudhury

615.322.2503

Improved Biomanufacturing Using Biological Clock Control for High Yield/Low Cost Bioproduct

A team of researchers at Vanderbilt University has developed a method of manipulating the circadian clock of cyanobacteria. This biological manipulation is used to increase gene expression in target genes that produce biofuel and high-value bioproducts, such as pharmaceuticals and cosmetics from precursor-expressing genes. Altering the circadian rhythm in the bacteria provides an improved approach to bioproduct development on a large scale using sunlight as a zero--cost energy solution.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Nanoporous Atomically Thin Graphene Membranes for Desalination & Nanofiltration

Vanderbilt researchers have developed an atomically thin membrane with extremely high selectivity and permeability for use in desalination and nanofiltration applications.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067