Browse Technologies

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Steerable Needles: A Better Turning Radius with Less Tissue Damage

A team of Vanderbilt engineers and surgeons have developed a new steerable needle that can make needle based biopsy and therapy delivery more accurate. A novel flexure-based tip design provides enhanced steerability while simultaneously minimizing tissue damage. The present device is useful for almost any needle-based procedure including biopsy, thermal ablation, brachytherapy, and drug delivery.

Non-Invasive Skin Cancer Detection using Raman Spectroscopy-OCT System (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt University researchers have designed a system for non-invasive discrimination between normal and cancerous skin lesions. The system combines the depth-resolving capabilities of OCT technique with Raman Spectroscopy's specificity of molecular chemistry. By linking both imagining techniques into a single detector arm, the complexity, cost, and size of previously reported RS-OCT instruments have been significantly improved. The combined instrument is capable of acquiring data sets that allow for more thorough assessment of a sample than existing optical techniques.

Systems and Methods for Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissues (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technique for contactless simulation of the central nervous system.  This involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system.  While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system. This technology has been protected by a portfolio of issued patents.

MAESTRO: Non-Robotic Dexterous Laproscopic Instrument with a Wrist providing seven degrees of freedom

Inventors at Vanderbilt University have developed a non-robotic dexterous laparoscopic manipulator with a wrist providing seven-degrees-of-freedom. It provides an interface which intuitively maps motion of the surgeon's hands to the tool's ""hands"". The novel user interface approach provides a natural mapping of motion from the surgeon's hands to the instrument tips.

MultiUse Multimodal Imaging Chelates

PK11195 is a high-affinity ligand of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). By linking lanthanide chelates to the PK11195 targeting moiety, Vanderbilt researchers have generated a range of PBR-targeted imaging probes capable of visualizing a number of disease states at cellular levels using a variety of imaging modalities (fl uorescence, PET and SPECT, MRI, electron microscopy).

Near-Infrared Dye with Large Stokes Shift for Simultaneous Multichannel in vivo Molecular Imaging

Fluorescent labels having near-infrared (NIR) emission wavelengths have the ability to penetrate tissue deeper than other emission wavelengths, providing enormous potential for non-invasive imaging applications. However, advancement of optical imaging (particularly NIR imaging) is hindered by the limitation of narrow Stokes shift of most infrared dyes currently available in the market. Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel NIR dye (4-Sulfonir) for multichannel imaging that enables in vivo imaging of multiple targets due to its large Stokes shift. 4-Sulfonir with its unique large Stokes shift (~150 nm) and wide excitation spectrum could be used in parallel with other NIR dyes for imaging two molecular events simultaneously in one target.

Structural Mapping of the Orbit from Clinically Acquired MRI and CT

Researchers at Vanderbilt have developed a method for automatically identifying 3D structures in the human orbit using clinical MRI and CT images. Using the generated orbital models, critical features that have been associated with prognosis can be extracted and 3D volume renderings, including the intra-optic nerve architecture, can be created.

Latent Image-Derived Features for Prognostic Modeling

Researchers at Vanderbilt have developed a system to estimate prognostic metrics such as the length of a hospital stay, recovery status at discharge, and overall health at discharge, using only baseline imaging and clinical information gathered early in the hospital admission process. This system can assist with medical group operations and planning, it can help to educate families and patients regarding prognosis, and can be used to automatically stage patients for clinical trials.

Assessment of Right Ventricular Function Using Contrast Echocardiography

Vanderbilt Medical Center researchers have developed a non-invasive and reproducible method of assessing right-ventricular function using contrast-echocardiography. The right-ventricular transit time (RVTT) measures the time needed for echocardiographic contrast to travel from the RV to the bifurcation of the main pulmonary artery. Coupled with the pulmonary transit time (PTT), the time needed for contrast to traverse the entire pulmonary circulation, RVTT is part of a family of diagnostic parameters that can report on RV-specific performance as well as the RV's function relative to that of the pulmonary circuit as a whole.

Two Degrees-of-Freedom, Fluid Power Stepper Actuator Model

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technology for use of a flexible fluidic actuator in MRI-guided surgical systems. This method eliminates the need for moving the patient out of the MRI machine, onto an operating table, and back in order to perform procedures. It is a safe, sterilized, and successful method to simplify MRI-guided surgical procedures.