Browse Technologies

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Non-Invasive Skin Cancer Detection using Raman Spectroscopy-OCT System (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt University researchers have designed a system for non-invasive discrimination between normal and cancerous skin lesions. The system combines the depth-resolving capabilities of OCT technique with Raman Spectroscopy's specificity of molecular chemistry. By linking both imagining techniques into a single detector arm, the complexity, cost, and size of previously reported RS-OCT instruments have been significantly improved. The combined instrument is capable of acquiring data sets that allow for more thorough assessment of a sample than existing optical techniques.


Systems and Methods for Optical Stimulation of Neural Tissues (Portfolio)

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technique for contactless simulation of the central nervous system.  This involves the use of infrared neural stimulation (INS) to evoke the observable action potentials from neurons of the central nervous system.  While infrared neural stimulation of the peripheral nervous system was accomplished almost a decade ago, this is the first technique for infrared stimulation of the central nervous system. This technology has been protected by a portfolio of issued patents.


MultiUse Multimodal Imaging Chelates

PK11195 is a high-affinity ligand of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). By linking lanthanide chelates to the PK11195 targeting moiety, Vanderbilt researchers have generated a range of PBR-targeted imaging probes capable of visualizing a number of disease states at cellular levels using a variety of imaging modalities (fl uorescence, PET and SPECT, MRI, electron microscopy).


Assessment of Right Ventricular Function Using Contrast Echocardiography

Vanderbilt Medical Center researchers have developed a non-invasive and reproducible method of assessing right-ventricular function using contrast-echocardiography. The right-ventricular transit time (RVTT) measures the time needed for echocardiographic contrast to travel from the RV to the bifurcation of the main pulmonary artery. Coupled with the pulmonary transit time (PTT), the time needed for contrast to traverse the entire pulmonary circulation, RVTT is part of a family of diagnostic parameters that can report on RV-specific performance as well as the RV's function relative to that of the pulmonary circuit as a whole.


Two Degrees-of-Freedom, Fluid Power Stepper Actuator Model

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a novel technology for use of a flexible fluidic actuator in MRI-guided surgical systems. This method eliminates the need for moving the patient out of the MRI machine, onto an operating table, and back in order to perform procedures. It is a safe, sterilized, and successful method to simplify MRI-guided surgical procedures.


3DMD SmartCasting System

Vanderbilt University researchers have  developed a new approach to corrective serial casting, particularly for the treatment of clubfoot, that produces a custom fit to patient anatomy and therapeutic need.


Molecular Image Fusion: Cross-Modality Modeling and Prediction Software for Molecular Imaging

A research team at Vanderbilt University Mass Spectrometry Research Center has developed the Molecular Image Fusion software system, that by fusing spatial correspondence between histology and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) measurements and cross-modality modeling, can predict ion distributions in tissue at spatial resolutions that exceed their acquisition resolution. The prediction resolution can even exceed the highest spatial resolution at which IMS can be physically measured. This software has been successfully tested on different IMS datasets and can be extended to other imaging modalities like MRI, PET, CT, profilometry, ion mobility spectroscopy, and different forms of microscopy.


Simultaneous RNA and Gene Expression Profiling Using Mass Spectrometry

This technology allows the simultaneous detection of RNA transcript abundance (as an assay of gene expression) and protein abundance (as an assay of protein expression) from biological samples without RNA isolation, labeling or amplification. Existing technologies allow for very efficient determinations of protein abundance from a wide variety of biological samples. These methods are in widespread use and are based on mass spectrometry technologies. There are no available technologies that allow efficient and quantitative assessment of multiple RNA transcripts without a previous isolation followed by labeling and/or amplification. The most efficient technologies currently available make use of DNA microarrays to profile RNA abundance as a measure of gene expression. While very robust and useful, these technologies are very labor intensive and suffer from a number of technological drawbacks. This technology takes advantage of a number of existing methods and techniques and brings them together in a novel manner that greatly expands the state of the art for gene expression.


Inexpensive Disposable Hydro-Jet Capsule Robot for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low-Income Countries

Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While screening programs have had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality, the majority of cases occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Typically, screening for gastric and esophageal cancer is performed using a flexible endoscope; however, endoscopy resources for these settings are traditionally limited. With the development of an inexpensive, disposable system by Vanderbilt researchers, gastroscopy and colonoscopy can be facilitated in areas hampered by a lack of access to the appropriate means.


A Simple and Highly Portable Flow Phantom for Doppler Ultrasound Quality Measurements

A new phantom has been designed in which Doppler ultrasound measurements can be conducted for quality assurance purposes. The phantom is highly portable, does not require power to operate, and allows for simple and reproducible measurements of Doppler ultrasound function. This combination of advantages allows for realistic monthly, weekly, even daily Doppler QA measurements.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris
chris.harris@vanderbilt.edu
615.343.4433
Medical Imaging