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MemoryMonitor: A real-time neuroscientific learning monitor that knows whether you will later remember something you see

We all wish that we could know if we were going to later remember something, the moment that new information enters our brain. For example, if we could predict whether our children would later remember a vocabulary word, then we could have them spend more time on the words they will not remember. A group of neuroscientists at Vanderbilt University has developed a way of measuring and analyzing brain activity that achieves this goal of predicting later memory as we study and view new information. The procedure involves measuring brainwaves from just two electrodes on the head as people view pictures, words, or virtually any kind of information that a person hopes to remember later.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Tissue Specific Expression of Serotonin Transporter in Transgenic Mouse

This research targets SERT.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

Rabbit Anti-human Large Neutral Amino Acid Transporter Antibody

This research targets LAT-1.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295

Inventors

Roy Zent
Research Tools
Antibody

Mouse Model for Cardiovascular/Autonomic Disorders

This research targets CHT.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Research Tools
Animal Model

HEK293 Cell Line with Stable Expression of Drosophila Serotonin Re-Uptake Transporter

This research targets SERT.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Research Tools
Cell Line
Neuroscience/Neurology

HEK-293 Cells with Stable Expression of Human Sodium Channel Nav1.3 and SNC1B, SNC2B Accessory Subunits

This research targets Nav1.3.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Research Tools
Cell Line
Neuroscience/Neurology

HEK Cells with Stable Expression of Human Brain Sodium Channel Nav1.1 Subunits (SCN1A, SCN1B, and SCN2B)

This is a human embryonic kidney cell line that stably expresses the three component proteins of the brain Navl.l voltage-gated sodium channel (SCNlA, SCNlB and SCN2B). The invention is important because mutation of the gene SCNlA is the most common cause of inherited epilepsy syndromes. In addition, voltage- gated sodium channels are important drug targets for anticonvulsant therapies. To our knowledge, this is the first cell line to simultaneously express all three components of Navl.l. The expression of all three proteins has been confirmed using western blot analysis. The stable cell line expresses the appropriate Nav


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Research Tools
Cell Line
Neuroscience/Neurology

Cell Line with Stable Expression of Mutant Human Voltage Gated Sodium Channel 1.1 (R1648H)

This research targets Nav1.1.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Research Tools
Cell Line
Neuroscience/Neurology

Cell Line with Stable Expression of Human Brain Sodium Channel Nav1.2, SCN1B, and SCN2B

This research targets Nav1.2.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295
Research Tools
Cell Line
Neuroscience/Neurology

GluN2B Floxed Mice (also called NR2B, glutamate receptor 2B)

Allows for targeted deletion of the GluN2B subunit of NMDA receptors in specific cells or at specific times during development, juvenile, or adult stages. C57BL6/J background


Licensing Contact

Jody Hankins

615.322.5907

Inventors

Eric Delpire
Research Tools
Animal Model
Neuroscience/Neurology