Browse Technologies

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A Method to Obtain Uniform Radio Frequency Fields in the Body for High Field MRI

Researchers at Vanderbilt have created a new approach to produce uniform radio frequency (RF) fields in the body during high field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Existing high field MRI machines create non-uniform RF fields that lead to non-uniform sensitivity in the generated images, also referred to as "hot" and "cold" spots. These local variations interfere with the tissue contrast of the images that radiologists depend upon to make accurate diagnoses. By generating uniform RF fields in the body, this technology provides the benefits of high field MRI without the non-uniform RF fields.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Advanced Method for Data Corrections in Organ Deformation

A group of Vanderbilt University researchers have developed a solution that will correct for the mis-registration of image data in image-guided surgery. The solution uses software to correct for any mis-registration that is caused by the presence of intraoperative deformations. This invention helps to improve the performance and capabilities of image-guided surgery.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Imaging

Advanced Ultrasound Imaging for Kidney Stone Detection

The standard for kidney stone detection is through the use of computed tomography (CT). However, CT is expensive and delivers harmful ionizing radiation into the body. Ultrasound would be the ideal way to detect kidney stones except that it performs poorly in detecting and accurately sizing stones. Vanderbilt researchers inventors have developed a technique that is able to separate hard, mineralized material (i.e kidney stones) from soft tissue in a way that is both cheaper and safer than CT and performs better than conventional ultrasound imaging.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Assessment of Right Ventricular Function Using Contrast Echocardiography

Vanderbilt Medical Center researchers have developed a non-invasive and reproducible method of assessing right-ventricular function using contrast-echocardiography. The right-ventricular transit time (RVTT) measures the time needed for echocardiographic contrast to travel from the RV to the bifurcation of the main pulmonary artery. Coupled with the pulmonary transit time (PTT), the time needed for contrast to traverse the entire pulmonary circulation, RVTT is part of a family of diagnostic parameters that can report on RV-specific performance as well as the RV's function relative to that of the pulmonary circuit as a whole.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433

Brain Shift Compensation Using Computer Models

The Vanderbilt University Biomedical Modeling Laboratory, led by Dr. Michael Miga, has developed a method to overcome intra-operative brain shifts experienced during neurosurgery using computer modeling that augments standard image-guided surgery technology. Current standard of care methods of image-guided surgery have limitations on accuracy, which is overcome by this new method.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067

Hyper-SHIELDED - Preserving Parahydrogen Spin Order by Efficient Transfer of Nuclear Singlet

Hyperpolarization of nuclear spin ensembles has increased NMR sensitivity to a level that is now enabling detection of metabolism in biological tissue on a time-scale of seconds. The present invention is a pulse sequence that efficiently transforms parahydrogen spin order into heteronuclear magnetization. This was achieved via a single streamlined sequence without recursive application, by finding sequential analytic solutions to the density matrix evolution for each of four independent intervals that collectively flank two proton inversions and one heteronuclear excitation. The name hyper-SHIELDED (Singlet to Heteronuclei by Interative Evolution Locks Dramatic Enhancement for Delivery) reflects the sequence's protective effect on PHIP hyperpolarization.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Inexpensive Disposable Hydro-Jet Capsule Robot for Gastric Cancer Screening in Low-Income Countries

Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death worldwide. While screening programs have had a tremendous impact on reducing mortality, the majority of cases occur in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Typically, screening for gastric and esophageal cancer is performed using a flexible endoscope; however, endoscopy resources for these settings are traditionally limited. With the development of an inexpensive, disposable system by Vanderbilt researchers, gastroscopy and colonoscopy can be facilitated in areas hampered by a lack of access to the appropriate means.


Licensing Contact

Masood Machingal

615.343.3548

Laser Range Scanning for Cortical Surface Registration & Deformation Tracking

This technology aligns a patient in an image-guided surgery system (registration) without the use of fiducial markers on the cranium exterior. The system utilizes laser range scanning technology, the features on the cortical surface and the corresponding natural features derived from the patient's preoperative MR-data. In addition, the technology is amenable to measuring deformation (brain shift) in order to compensate for intra-operative registration error.


Licensing Contact

Philip Swaney

615.322.1067
Medical Imaging

Latent Image-Derived Features for Prognostic Modeling

Researchers at Vanderbilt have developed a system to estimate prognostic metrics such as the length of a hospital stay, recovery status at discharge, and overall health at discharge, using only baseline imaging and clinical information gathered early in the hospital admission process. This system can assist with medical group operations and planning, it can help to educate families and patients regarding prognosis, and can be used to automatically stage patients for clinical trials.


Licensing Contact

Chris Harris

615.343.4433
Medical Imaging

Molecular Image Fusion: Cross-Modality Modeling and Prediction Software for Molecular Imaging

A research team at Vanderbilt University Mass Spectrometry Research Center has developed the Molecular Image Fusion software system, that by fusing spatial correspondence between histology and imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) measurements and cross-modality modeling, can predict ion distributions in tissue at spatial resolutions that exceed their acquisition resolution. The prediction resolution can even exceed the highest spatial resolution at which IMS can be physically measured. This software has been successfully tested on different IMS datasets and can be extended to other imaging modalities like MRI, PET, CT, profilometry, ion mobility spectroscopy, and different forms of microscopy.


Licensing Contact

Karen Rufus

615.322.4295