Browse Technologies

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'Coffee Ring' Diagnostic for Point-of-Care Biomarker Detection

Bright minds at Vanderbilt University have unveiled a breakthrough technology that could bring sophisticated biomarker diagnostics to the developing world. The point-of-care diagnostic is designed to be used in the field; no specialized equipment, expertise, or white lab coats are required. The diagnostic is based upon the ingenous observation that evaporating liquid droplets leave behind a characteristic ring pattern, which may be familiar to our readers in the form of a coffee-ring stain.


Collapsible Lightweight Portable Leg Holder for Ultrasound Guided Lateral Popliteal Block Procedures

A Vanderbilt team led by anesthesiologist Dr. Rajnish Gupta has developed a collapsible, lightweight and portable patient leg positioner for secure and stable leg positioning during ultrasound guided nerve block anesthetic procedures.


Coordinated Control for Arm Prosthesis

Researchers at Vanderbilt have created a novel control of an (myoelectric) arm prosthesis consisting of at least an elbow joint with the possibility of an additional single or multi-axis wrist joint.


Flat-Cut Bit for Cranial Perforator

Inventors at Vanderbilt have developed a novel perforating drill bit for cranial surgery. Deep brain stimlation (DBS) has become a technique for the treatment of movement disorders, as well as obsessive compulsive disorders and epilespy. This cranial drill bit significantly improves the process of preparing the periphery around the cranial punch during electrode implantation, one of the critical steps during DBS surgery.


Gene Signature Diagnostic to Measure LKB1 Loss and MEK Inhibitor Sensitivity

A Vanderbilt research group has discovered a diagnostic to identify patients with non-small cell lung cancer that would respond to MEK inhibitor therapies. This diagnostic indirectly measures loss of tumor suppressor activity by the protein LKB1. The traditional approach to determine MEK inhibitor sensitivity, which is measurement of LKB1 mutations, misses 50% of patients who would benefit from these drugs. This diagnostic measures expression of a small panel of genes to identify a larger population that is sensitive to MEK inhibition.


Licensing Contact

Mike Villalobos
mike.villalobos@vanderbilt.edu
615.322.6751
Diagnostics
Oncology

Grasping Applicator for Surgical Positioning (GRASP)

A team of Vanderbilt engineers and surgeons has developed a novel bone and tissue graft placement device, primarily for use in the nasal and skull base cavities. The device uses a unique grasping technique to provide control and finesse in the placement of such grafts in addition to combining the roles of multiple instruments into a single device. The clinical purpose of this tool is to provide surgeons with an instrument that can grasp, place, and manipulate rigid and non-rigid graft materials in a controlled manner for skull base reconstruction; such control is very desirable in order to recreate a sound bony barrier that separates the intracranial and extracranial spaces.


Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Infectious Diseases

Using human B cell hybridoma creation, and antibody engineering technologies, Dr. James E Crowe Jr.'s laboratory has developed an array of antibodies from full length human antibodies to Fab fragments and diabodies. Many of these antibodies are ready for a cooperate partner who can further develop these antibodies into biologic herapeutics. The table below is a sample of the antibodies they are currently researching and have available. In addition to these areas of research, Dr. Crowe is actively seeking collaborative opportunities to identify new interesting targets for future antibody engineering projects.


Model-based Compression Correction Framework for Ultrasound

Vanderbilt researchers have developed a system that uses tracking and digitization information to detect the pose of an ultrasound probe during the imaging of soft tissue.  This information is used with a biomechanical model of the tissue to correct compressional effects during intraoperative imaging.


Multisubstrate Inhibitors of Histone Acetylation Increase the Cytotoxicity of Chemotherapeutic Agents

Inhibitors of histone acetylation may constitute a novel class of potent therapy sensitizers applicable to a broad range of conventional cancer treatments.


New Insect Repellants Disrupt Olfactory Cues: A Strategy for Pest Protection

A multinational research team, led by Dr. L. J. Zwiebel of Vanderbilt University, has identified new compounds with potential as insect repellents. These compounds work by capitalizing on knowledge of how insect odorant receptors detect and respond to scents. Medicinal chemistry efforts have yielded a number of novel compounds that could short-circuit the insect olfactory system, essentially by over-stimulation, to effectively mask attractive odors. These compounds could be used to repel nuisance and disease-carrying insects away from humans and animals, as well as repel agricultural pests from crops or food storage facilities. Vanderbilt University is seeking commercial partners to develop the technology for agricultural uses.